Category Archives: Velomobiles

Rhein-Waal-Maas Day 6: Roermond to Kempen

Day 3 of the second tour.

We had another good night’s sleep at the Vrienden op de fiets house in Roermond and were treated to a very good breakfast.

The bikes had spent the night safely in the garden.

Our hosts had to leave at 10am so we said goodbye to them at 9:30 and set off on our last stage of the tour.

We did quite a lot of this route just two weeks ago when I rode Humphrey to Roermond with Klaus and Ralf, and the route is very pleasant with lots of quiet roads. There were a few speedbumps which are not quite as comfortable in Millie as in Humphrey.

We saw this beautiful church underway.

We stopped for a short break and to enjoy the sunshine and chatted to a dog walker (who is rather unfortunately rendered in the photo below). I took the photo below because Millie was nicely reflected in Celeste!

This is what Klaus could see from his vantage point!

We enjoyed the quiet roads, although there were lots of leisure cyclists out as well, but we often had the whole road to ourselves!

Our plan was to stop in Venlo for some lunch/cake but as we came over the bridge into the town there seemed to be an awful lot of cyclists and walkers. As we reached the town it was clear something was going on – I have never seen so many bikes parked in one place. They were everywhere! There were sound stages and people dressed as runners… it was Venloop which is an annual half marathon. We knew it would be pointless to try to stop somewhere for food, plus we couldn’t really ride anywhere as it was all so packed. Instead we stayed on the roads and tried to make our way to the east so we could get on the road to Germany but road closures made it pretty tricky. We got lots of cheers from spectators – it was great to see that pretty much every Venlo resident was there, hanging out of the windows or cheering from the pavement.

We finally got across the main road into Venlo and could head towards the glider airfield. On the way we saw this very impressive bunting with the balloon runner!

We stopped for a while to watch the gliders and then discussed where we could go for cake. We both knew of, but had not visited, a café/restaurant not far away down an unmade road. We gave it a go and the unmade road was fine and the cake at Birkenhof was very tasty!

We were home fairly early after our ride of 61.62km which we cycled at an average speed of 18.7 km/h (very relaxed). My average heart rate for this ride was now a super-low 120 bpm.

We really enjoyed both our mini tours, although we were blessed with better weather for the second one. A tour of 3 days can be a very rich and exciting experience so we are considering whether we can manage more in the future by just taking one day off work. We shall see!

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Rhein-Waal-Maas Day 5: Maastricht to Roermond

The second day of our second mini-tour.

We slept well and as agreed went down for breakfast at 8 o’clock. Anke had provided us a very good spread of breakfast items.

She talked to us a little about some of the cycle tours she had done.

Anke had to leave at 9 so we were gone before then. We decided to visit Maastricht itself and cycled over the bridge and through the pedestrian zone a little.

We found ourselves in a large square with lots of buildings around it and a large church.

Klaus took this interesting pic of Celeste!

And also this Panorama view of the square.

Here is Millie in front of the church.

Klaus had talked several times about the bookshop in a church so we googled it and discovered it was just around the corner. As I pulled up outside I noticed Millie rather nicely reflected in the doors!

We parked outside.

It was a beautiful building inside with very clever design for the bookshelves on three levels.

There was also a café where the altar used to be and so we stopped for a cuppa.

We set off again after a nice relaxing time in the bookshop and wended our way through Maastricht town on a Saturday morning. There was lots on as the weather was good. Klaus stopped to take a picture of a building and Millie photobombed him!

We then crossed the river and looked back at the town (photo by Klaus).

It was lovely to just stand in the sunshine, warm enough to be outside the velomobiles without jumpers/coats on.

However, we were on a bike tour so it was time to set off towards Roermond.

Our route today was as follows:

On the way to Maastricht we had ridden on the west side of the river/canal, this time we were going up the east side.

We had plenty of time for the 60km day so decided we would stop for a leisurely cake halfway if we could find somewhere. There were lots of interesting places along the way.

Here I stopped for a photo of a lovely church:

And at the same time Klaus was also photographing it from further back – you can see Millie in his shot.

You can tell from the skies in the above photos that it was turning into a really lovely day. The temperature was about 10 degrees but inside the velomobiles we were toasty warm.

It’s a very nice route that we were riding although surprisingly quiet for a Saturday, except for lots of MAMILs riding in chain gangs.

At about halfway we started looking for somewhere to stop for a cuppa but couldn’t find anything. Finally, just past Berg an de Maas, we discovered a restaurant with lots of signs saying ‘Open’ so stopped, only to find that the door was locked. We rang the bell but no response came. As we were waiting two more cyclists came and sat down.

We started checking on our phones to see if there was anywhere else open not too far away when a car arrived and two people got out carrying parcels from a bakery. It was the owners of the restaurant and they had cake. A bit odd they hadn’t put a sign up to say “back in 5 minutes” or something, but anyway, we got our tea and slice of cake.

Although they spoke no German or English and we spoke no Dutch we managed to communicate perfectly well.

In Maasbracht we saw this very pretty view whilst we were riding down a bit of a hill (photo by Klaus)

And we stopped to look at this windmill. Some passers-by said “hello” to us and they turned out to be Brits.

We continued on and eventually arrived in Roermond at 3 o’clock. I phoned the Vrienden op de fiets host but got no reply so we decided to go to the riverfront and eat something. We had originally said we expected to be there at 5pm so being two hours early meant perhaps they were out.

We ordered a bit of food

And Klaus relaxed with a bit of sun worship

We received an email from the host saying they were at home, possibly in their back garden, so we headed off there.
It was a retired couple with a lovely quaint house with lots of wood panelling (I reckon the chap used to be a joiner or something similar). This was our room:After we had showered Klaus got in touch with his friend Istvan who lives in Roermond to see if he was free. He and his wife invited us for dinner, so we hopped into the Velomobiles and rode the 3km to Istvan’s house, where we had a very tasty meal and lots of very good conversation. Istvan and his wife Ingrid were really interesting people and it was great to get to know them. Klaus met Istvan through a photography forum and had known him for ten years or so.Istvan has a very good coffee machine…We also had some cake!We were all pretty tired so headed off at 9:30pm through Roermond, which was a really lovely ride in the dark on the good cycle paths.The total ride today was 58.52km at an average of 18.4 km/h.Here are the statistics, note that the average heart rate is a very relaxed 120.Once again we were really happy with the Vrienden op de fiets accommodation. The velomobiles were in the garden under an awning and well away from prying eyes. We slept very well after our cycling and socialising!

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Rhein-Waal-Maas Day 4: Kempen to Maastricht

And so the second part of our Tour began!

We had two days at home after the first three touring days, during which we washed our cycling gear and I collected Millie from friend Ralf’s where she had been staying.

My initial feeling when riding Millie was “wow, she is so easy and fast!” and the fact she is also a lot quieter than Humphrey was also fairly noticeable.

This was a chance to see if my difficulties with Humphrey were because of my fitness rather than his form. It was also a chance for me to rest my tired good arm and to enjoy a bit more cockpit space!

We decided that on the first day we would ride to Maastricht and so began the search for hotels which had room for velomobiles. We did lots of searching and didn’t find any very good options, so decided instead to join Vrienden op de Fiets and see if there were options to stay in Maastricht.

For those who don’t know, Vrienden op de fiets is a Dutch organisation where people can offer to host cyclists and the cyclist pays 19,00 EUR per night including breakfast. It costs only 10 EUR to join and then you have access to the database of hosts.

There were several in Maastricht and Roermond (for the next day) but in the end only one in each place was available. You are of course staying in people’s private houses and if they have something else on then it’s a no-go. Anyway, we had a place booked with a lady in Maastricht and with a chap in Roermond and thought we’d give it a go.

Klaus had planned the route this time, and this was our first day’s route:

It was planned to go past Ralf’s house as he thought he might be able to join us for some of the ride but in the end he wasn’t able.

We set off at 10:30am having packed everything into our velomobiles (I had to remember how to best utilise Millie’s limited space) and we headed off on very familiar roads at first.

It was a grey day and the weather forecast was for clouds all day but at least the temperatures were warmer than at the start of the first part of this tour – when it was snowing and minus four degrees! We were also happy to know that the forecast was improving for the next two days.

Unfortunately Klaus had an altercation with a dodgy driver after just 3km. Approaching a red traffic light the chap did an incredibly close pass on Klaus and then stopped at the light and jumped out and started remonstrating with Klaus. Klaus was about to get out of his velomobile (at which point he would have been seen to be considerably larger than this chap!) and the chap got back in his car and drove off when the lights went green. This wasn’t a very pleasant start to the tour, and especially not in Kempen which is Really Above That Kind Of Thing. The altercation happened 50 metres from the ‘Fahrradfreundliche Stadt’ sign (Bicycle-friendly city).

However, I guess all cyclists have these experiences from time to time, and we just have to suck it up and get on with our ride. Which we did.

At the roundabout onto the road to Grefrath we transition from the road to the cycle path and it’s a bit of a bumpy corner. Klaus was ahead and I noticed something black bouncing around in his wake. I cycled past it and it was a large black plastic circle. I couldn’t think where it came from on Celeste… and then after about 100 metres I suddenly realised it was a rolled-up inner tube. So I stopped and went back and indeed it was one of Klaus’s spare tubes that had bounced out of the luggage storage space at the front of Celeste. It was a Schwalbe one so that was a good 5 Euros saved!

Along the road to Grefrath we suddenly found ourselves riding over a couple of broken bottles. We stopped and immediately cleaned the tyres as best we could – I didn’t fancy getting a puncture, especially as I hadn’t had one since 1 January 2017!

As we headed into Lobberich I realised I was pretty desperate for the loo. I knew there were loos at Café Floral so we agreed to stop there. You can pay to use a loo if you aren’t a customer in Germany but in the end we decided to stop and to share a slice of cake, we chose this very nice cherry meringue cream confection.

We also had a cuppa each and enjoyed warming up a bit. But we realised that stopping after 17km on a 105km day was perhaps not the best distribution of breaks so it was time to ride on.

We rode past Breyell and then as we were heading to Boisheim I noticed Millie felt a bit rough. Soon enough that regular bump-bump-bump feeling intruded – clearly a puncture. Not only was it the first in fifteen months but I had had the same tyres on the whole time (which were pretty worn out). I used to use Duranos on Millie and had a puncture a week; since fitting Durano Pluses I had been puncture-free. They are heavier tyres so you pay a little with speed/efficiency but it is worth it as tyre changing is a pain in the neck.

It was cold where we stopped to change the tube and tyre and the cold wind whistling past us wasn’t nice. We put the new Durano Plus on and saw a very impressive flint that had got the whole way through the Durano Plus; the tyre was absolutely peppered with other pieces of stone and glass but they had all been stopped by the puncture-resistant band. I am very impressed with how these tyres have performed, and they had done 9000km too.

Our tyre changing provided a small amount of entertainment for the locals, as did pumping up a tyre to 8 bar (110 PSI) with a small hand pump, but we managed it between us and set off again.

We were approaching slightly less flat territory and I found myself on the road doing 61km/h at one point. I ended up with a Strava Queen of the Mountains for this so that was a bonus!

Klaus had routed us to the Meinweg National Park as we have ridden this great, smooth cycle road in the other direction but never going towards NL. Just before we crossed into the national park, whilst till in Germany, we had to have a pee stop behind some trees. This is very illegal in the Netherlands although apparently it is OK in Germany, so we made the most of the opportunity. I had also realised that if we were to make the time our host requested (between 17:00 and 17:30) we probably wouldn’t be able to have another stop – and had 70km to ride! This was a bit of pressure!

So we set off, riding separately at our own pace. Klaus had great fun with Celeste, managing to hit 71 km/h. I was a bit slower but enjoyed the downhills. We were now in the Netherlands.

We now followed Klaus’s track through some very nice countryside indeed, with lots of quiet lanes. Most of the photos below are taken by Klaus (as you can probably tell by the colour of the velomobile nose in shot!)

Following the pre-prepared Garmin track is very easy and means that we could relax and just enjoy the pedalling. There were a few trickier bits, such as finding the way onto the cycle track to cross this bridge. We were crossing a canal that runs a little way away from the Maas.

Most of our route was very good cycle paths, with some quiet B roads as well. We were making good progress, Millie was much easier for me to ride and the warmer weather also helped. Because we were following the canal and also later the Maas river we crossed from one side of the dyke to the other quite regularly and this included some short, steep climbs to get onto the dyke. At this point I discovered that Millie’s Schlumpf really doesn’t sound very healthy when in its low gear. Having now ridden Humphrey, who also has a Schlumpf, I know how it should feel and sound – and Millie’s is not well. I am making plans to either replace it or to put a normal double chainset on there, and also to reduce the size of the large chainring to assist me with hill starts etc. When riding along one has plenty of time to plan these things…

We crossed the Maas river with a ferry at Berg and then found ourselves in Belgium, so this was a 3 countries tour again.

As you can see, the road surface was pretty rough in Belgium, but it was a nice ride along the top of the dyke for quite a few kilometres before we turned and rode alongside the canal towards Maastricht.

We had ridden from Maastricht to Lanaken on our previous tour in this region and this time we approached Maastricht in the reverse direction, arriving where there were a lot of roadworks but we were waved through. The cycle path was still mostly in place!

Klaus photographed this former church which is now a gym. He had previously told me about a church in Maastricht which was now a bookshop, so they are obviously repurposing some redundant buildings!

We rode straight to our Vrienden House and arrived at the right time, having ridden the 70km non-stop. We met our hostess, Anke, who was very friendly and spoke very good German. Although I had sent her links to internet pages about velomobiles when checking she had room in her garage, she was a bit surprised how large they were. However, we did manage to fit them in her garage (she had recently had to empty her deceased mother’s house of belongings so they were stored in the garage too).

We had a good chat to Anke and our room was very nice. She had to go out in the evening but we said we wouldn’t do much, just go out for food, so we walked just down the road to a pizzeria we had noticed. It was very high quality food and I noticed they also had a Pizza Celeste!

We very much enjoyed our pizzas (we are off the low-carb diet when touring) and it was then time for bed. I am always pooped after a long cycle ride, particularly without many stops! In the end I went to bed at 20:15 so this is really showing my age! But we were very encouraged by our first experience of Vrienden op de fiets and already started discussing whether we could use this for our summer tour around the Netherlands in June.

Today’s ride was 106km and here are my statistics, the average heart rate is lower than on the first day of the tour with Humphrey but still pretty high.

We had purposely planned a shorter day the next day, just 55km to Roermond, but it was great to be touring again, even just for three days, and great to be in Millie again with the more comfortable cockpit for me.

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Rhein-Waal-Maas Day 1: Kempen to Rees am Rhein

Day 1 of the Tour

We had seen the weather forecast and consequently planned a short day (under 60km) for today. My original route had been less direct and 20km more but with lots of snow and ice yesterday, and continuing light snow this morning meant we definitely wanted to limit the distance. It was minus 3 outside so we faffed around at home in the morning waiting for the snow to clear.

It didn’t, there were still periodic white flurries, but it wasn’t settling so we decided to set off anyway.

Yesterday we had pumped up the tyres and given the bikes a once-over, plus added my Garmin speed sensor to the rear axle and cadence sensor to the crank. Today we just hopped in and set off – once I had got my new Garmin to recognise the cadence and speed sensors, as well as the heart rate monitor. This was the work of moments, the whole thing extremely easy. Top marks to Garmin!

I have never previously ridden with a cadence sensor so today’s ride would be an interesting learning experience.

This was our route for today:

So we set off with flakes of snow swirling about. In this photo I tried to get some snowflakes but I don’t think I was successful!

We both chose to ride with the Schaumdeckel (foam cover) but underneath that we each just had one long-sleeved cycling top; you don’t need lots of layers inside a Velomobile as you generate your own warmth.

We planned to ride to Xanten first and stop there for lunch. Xanten is somewhere we ride to fairly regularly so we knew the way very well, but this time we were largely cycling on the cycle paths rather than on the road. This was because we were slower due to the weather. There were some icy patches so we had to take care.

We took the normal roads to Stenden, then Sevelen; we love the road to Sevelen as it is 7km of dead straight road with hardly any junctions (= Velomobile fun!) but when you are riding slowly and there is a bitter side wind buffeting you about it seems quite a lot longer!! We were not quick, but that was to be expected as it was very cold!

One thing that disturbed me a little on this ride was the wind noise whistling over the front of the QuattroVelo. I don’t know if it’s the sound of the wind on the visor, on the mirrors or just generally on the front, but at times it was a real banshee shrieking and it was very annoying. This  noise was louder than the gear noises! It seems to be related to side winds as when we changed direction it reduced, but it was very annoying. Klaus says he has it too on his Strada.

After cycling for an hour it was time to stop to put our feet down. When riding Velomobiles you can get cold feet and also lose the sensation in your toes a bit, so it is good to stop and take your feet out of the clipless pedals and let the blood flow back into them. Klaus especially has problems with cold feet when it is less than 10 degrees outside, and it was definitely that today! We stopped in a lay-by just after Issum for a five minute break.

We set off again, this time with me in the lead and on the road (no cycle path). This was a faster stretch and the snow had stopped, but it was still really cold! We wended our way towards Xanten and I also began to get very cold feet. The QuattroVelo has two large openings for the feet and they let the cold air in, and when the wind blew from a particular side angle it blew cold air up my trouser leg!

We had to go over a couple of motorway bridges and I noticed that my heart rate was very high on these slight inclines – reaching 190bpm. In fact, this year my heart rate has generally been very high when cycling (although my resting heart rate has reduced to 60 bpm) so I wonder if this has anything to do with the low carb diet. My average heart rate for the whole ride was 162, whereas Klaus’s was 133, which is where mine used to be. Perhaps it is just a sign of my lack of fitness.

There wasn’t much traffic about as we rolled into Xanten. We stopped at our usual cafe and ordered some hot soup and a hot cup of tea.

Klaus tried to thaw out his feet but it took a long time!

We sat in the cafe for about an hour, enjoying the break and the hot food. Klaus’s feet slowly began to regain some sensation, but we knew we would be pedalling in the cold again soon. Whilst we were waiting the skies cleared of snow and we saw some blue at last!

We set off out of Xanten taking a different route than normal. We usually take the Alleenradweg which goes to Marienbaum but this time we stayed closer to the Rhein, again staying on the cycle path. We had the fun of having to press some traffic light buttons which is not very easy from within a Velomobile with the Schaumdeckel on!

Part of this route goes along the Rhein flood dykes and this was great fun with a tailwind, comfortable cruising. The QuattroVelo isn’t fast but once it gets going it rolls nicely, and it is definitely smoother over rough roads than the Milan.

It was just 18km to Rees and the time passed quickly. We rolled over the bridge and then headed for the town, finding our way easily to our hotel, Rheintoreins.

We checked into the hotel, storing the Velomobiles in a locked garage, and then Klaus photographed himself in a ball whilst I was filling in the paperwork…

The room was very nice and we each had a much-appreciated hot shower and a cuppa as we warmed up a bit.

We went out in search of food and Klaus took these pictures of Rees.

We cycled over the bridge in the distance.

And proof of which river we were visiting today:

We found an Italian restaurant and had a pizza (carbohydrates!) as we fancied one after all our riding, then returned to our hotel.

The weather forecast is a bit better for tomorrow – cold still, but perhaps 3-4 degrees warmer than today, and with a slightly reduced wind. We hope to have slightly warmer feet during our riding. We have a bit further to go, 77km, but should have the wind more at our backs which will help.

And the statistics for my ride today, from Garmin Connect:

As you can see, I have a very low cadence (pedalling speed). We knew this, but it is interesting to now measure it. I cannot pedal any faster, this is my comfortable speed and has served me well for a decade.

Anyway, we are pleased to be on tour again despite the Siberian weather, and hope for another good day tomorrow.

And here is Klaus’s report for the day:

Wir sind erst gegen 12 Uhr losgefahren, um dem Schnee zu entgehen… naja hat nicht ganz geklappt. Ein ordentlicher Wind aus Nordost hat uns noch ein paar Flöckchen um die Ohren gehauen. Eigentlich ist es im VM schön kuschelig, aber die Fusszehen sind mir nach 2h fast abgefroren. Nach 1h Pause in Xanten hatte ich dann wieder etwas Gefühl in den Zehen. Die letzten 18 Kilometer waren einfach zu cruisen, da der Wind von schräg hinten kam.

Tomorrow we will cycle along the Nederrijn to Arnhem and will then rejoin the Rhine as it has become the Waal at Nijmegen. We are looking forward to it!

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Auntie Helen buys *another* Velomobile – Humphrey the Quattrovelo

A long, long time ago I ordered a Quattrovelo. Then I received this birthday cake celebrating it…

But then I had second thoughts about my ability to get in and out due to my disability and bought a second hand Milan instead. My place on the order list for the Quattrovelo was handed over to chum Detlef who duly received his Quattrovelo.

However, last April when visiting Velomobiel.nl to get Millie and Celeste serviced I had a trial sit in a Quattrovelo again and found it was fine to get in and out of. So, once again, I appeared on the orderlist.

When you have a Milan, why buy a Quattrovelo?

This is a good question! However, I did have my reasons.

Firstly, the negative points about the Milan GT.

  • It is very low-slung which means you scrape the bottom on most kerbs.
  • It has a very wide turning circle (something like 14 metres) which means lots of cycle tracks are off-limits.
  • Storage space for luggage isn’t very easy to access.
  • In my Milan the chainline isn’t protected so you end up with an oily left leg most days
  • If there is a rear puncture that’s a half hour job and not much fun at all as you have to take off the entire back wheel (this has only happened twice, fortunately)
  • The rear gears would be a complete nightmare if I had to replace anything. It doesn’t bear thinking about if something broke such as the gear hanger.
  • And, the real biggie for me, it is decidedly unwaterproof, even with the Haube (hood). This meant that if rain was forecasted I tried to avoid using the Milan as I would get a wet backside when getting in and out, wet legs from the rain that channels over the bridge and then my leggings soak it up over my thighs, and even wet feet from the rain coming in the holes for the lights. Also rain on my lap from the Naca duct.

The positive points about the Milan GT are legion, but include:

  • Looks fab!
  • Very comfortable riding position
  • Easy to get in and out – as long as your hips aren’t as wide as mine (the phrase “cork in a bottle” springs to mind)
  • Fast, fast, fast. Even for an overweight woman like me, Millie is very fast. With sidewinds she is even faster. I can keep up with Klaus when riding Millie and he is lighter, fitter and male. She evens out the disadvantages I have being female, underpowered and overheavy.

And what can the Quattrovelo offer that the Milan can’t?

  • The Quattrovelo is not a direct competitor to the Milan. It’s definitely not as fast but it has many other advantages, the main ones being excellent luggage space, easier access to rear wheels and gear gubbins and it is pretty waterproof.

So anyway, I decided to go back onto the orderlist for the Quattrovelo as I felt that having a second option of velomobile for my regular commute and maybe for touring too would be good. I sold Penelope so there was space in the second garage…

The waiting list is long…

Quattrovelos are relatively new and the waiting list was about 10 months. This gave me plenty of time to choose my colour and other specifications.

I had decided on a green colour and then when visiting Velomobiel.nl we saw a two-tone QV, dark green bottom with cream top, and I decided that would be for me, except not such a dark green.  I spent the next six months looking at different car colours until I fixed on British Racing Green as it appears on the BMW Mini.

I also decided for a Schlumpf Mountain Drive as I have in Millie, the standard open cockpit (not the Alienhaube or covering hood as it made me feel a bit claustrophobic).

And then finally:

I received an email with the above photo attached. My Quattrovelo had arrived in Dronten and was being prepared.

So two weeks later Klaus and I set off to Dronten, having borrowed friend Ralf’s Sprinter van so we could transport both velomobiles back (Celeste was going for her annual service), and here I am at my first meeting with Quattrovelo number 74:

When I test rode the Quattrovelo last spring I was 15kg lighter so was a bit worried if I would be able to get in and out of my QV. In worked OK…

Out was a challenge but possible if I opened the rear luggage space so I could put my arm there to brace myself as I lifted out.

Whilst we were at Dronten a couple of friends from Cologne popped in to collect a repaired velomobile and Klaus from Köln took several photos of QV74.

In the photo above you can see a reflection of other velomobiles that were being worked on. And in the picture below, a very elongated Quest!

In the photo above you can see the ‘boot’ is open. This is usually fixed shut by means of a velcro strap. However, I was unable to remove this strap whilst sitting in my seat and, as mentioned above, I needed to open the boot to put my hand behind me to get out.

Allert, Klaus and I discussed this and the best option seemed to be some cord that holds the boot shut but runs through eyelets so I can have the end in the cabin with me. Theo found some random pink and white cord to use, which isn’t exactly a matching colour scheme but does the job! Allert welded a couple of eyelets and fixed them inside the boot:

And then to an area behind my right shoulder to help the cord go round the back of the seat.

This cord was to hold the boot closed when travelling (not to close it, I do that with my hand, but the cord prevents it opening in strong winds).

When the boot is open the cord is loose behind my right shoulder on the rear wheel arch.

On the end of this rope was some sticky velcro which I could affix beside me when the boot is shut and it is an easy job to just unstick it if I want to open the boot. I can reach round and pull it tight and then fix it on the side of the QV to my right.

The system works well and in fact Klaus thinks he might have it on his Quattrovelo which should arrive early next year.

Here are some more of Klaus from Köln’s pictures:

Allert spent quite a long time getting my seat positioned correctly. Initially it was too far forward, I needed it further back as I have long legs. Moving the seat back made it easier to get out in some ways, but then the angle of seat recline had to change so that my shoulders didn’t bump on the sill around the opening and this made it harder again to get out. But I tried several times to get in and out and it worked, although not elegantly.

Once the seat position was decided Allert adjusted the chain length. Klaus and I both rode around the block and all seemed OK so the handover was completed with various other bits and bobs (pump for the tyres, pump for the air shocks for the rear wheel, spare battery etc etc). Then Klaus and I spent half an hour trying to squeeze Celeste and the QV into the Sprinter. It was not easy as the QV is so wide! In the end we had to build up a false floor where the step is for the side door so that Celeste could rest one wheel on that. We managed in the end, but not before poor Klaus had put his back out lifting Celeste.

We drove home (Klaus feeling very uncomfortable with his back) and unloaded the Sprinter before Klaus retired to bed with a hot water bottle at his back and I just put the QV in the garage, it was too late to have another ride.

First impressions of the QV

How it looks

The Quattrovelo looks great! I am extremely pleased with my colour choice and it has lots of different shades in the sunlight.

One of my first jobs was to fix some reflective blue and red tape to the mirrors for my Union Jack theme (after all, I had to Britishfy this velomobile otherwise no-one would know it was mine!). I did this job in the garage in the freezing cold without removing the mirrors so it was rather inexpert but was a start and I planned to do it again properly once I had discovered how well the tape stuck.

Here are a couple of pictures showing the lovely colour of my QV, this time parked outside my office.

How it rides

My first ride with the QV was to join the ‘Fit durch den Winter’ ride from the ADFC to Wachtendonk. I had to ride first to Kempen where we were gathering before setting off to Wachtendonk. The ride to Kempen seemed quite slow and also very noisy – the cassette of gears is just behind the rider’s seat and the first three gears are pretty noisy.

I ended up being slightly late because the journey to Kempen had taken longer than expected so they were just setting off as I got there.

Off we headed in quite strong wind and I found it very tough going. The Quattrovelo felt slow, heavy and generally tough. There were times when I found it difficult to catch up with people on upright bikes – and these were people on Dutch bikes cycling in jeans and jumpers!

We stopped at Wachtendonk for tea and cake and then it was time to head back. I adjusted the seat position slightly (more reclined) for the ride back. The side of the Quattrovelo bends in and I found that my right elbow rubbed against the side of the velomobile, I wondered if I would end up with a weal after a long cycle ride, but seat adjustments couldn’t really help this. Losing a lot more weight would help, but that’s not exactly a quick fix!

By the time we got back to Kempen I was worn out and decided not to stay for a cuppa with the other riders but go straight home. I was actually rather disappointed with the Quattrovelo, but assumed I was just having a bad day.

The next day I rode it to work. Again it was hard work and noisy, and my average speed was 16.9 km/h. This was Penelope speed levels – Millie is usually 22-24 for my direct commute. My colleagues asked me how I liked it and I said I was rather disappointed.

I commuted the next day too, very slightly faster at 17.8 km/h. That evening was my choir in Kempen so I decided to ride there. I set off and after 1km the lights went out; the battery was flat and I had forgotten to put a spare in! So I had to ride back in the pitch black, trusting only to street lights and my reflectives on the bike. I ran upstairs to get the battery, completely out of breath because of riding the heavy, slow Quattrovelo. I fitted the new battery and rode to choir – I was late because of all this. My average speed ended up at 18.6 km/h, again Penelope territory rather than a faster velomobile.

When I got home I said to Klaus that I was really fed up. I was finding the Quattrovelo really slow and I didn’t want to go back to Penelope speeds and always be struggling to keep up with people. I didn’t know whether to keep the Quattrovelo – if it were going to be this slow there was no point. Millie was in storage at Ralf’s workshop waiting for her indicators to be fixed – I wanted her back to remind myself what speeds I could do!

Klaus counseled that it was super cold outside (-7 degrees for my commute) and that the velomobile was brand new and had to be run in. He also checked the wheels and noticed that the front right was binding – the brake had not been correctly adjusted. We corrected this in under a minute and then at least that wheel could run freely, although this would have only had a very minor effect. We have heard several tales of velomobiles collected by their new owners showing issues with the preparation – including two quite serious issues, so this is something to watch.

Millie was out of reach and needed new indicators anyway so I kept going with the Quattrovelo (which was always my plan anyway). We were discussing the bike tour we had planned for the middle of March – I said I couldn’t imagine cycling those distances in the Quattrovelo, it would kill me. Our plan was to cycle around the Pfalz region to see some of the almond blossoms but in the end we decided we would spend the week just doing tours from home or staying overnight a couple of times not too far from home, so I could ride as much as felt comfortable. This eased my mind a bit as I was very scared of consecutive 100km days in the Quattrovelo.

The horrendously cold temperatures gradually eased and with it the speeds crept up on the QV. Below is a screenshot of all my commutes which were direct (i.e. not going via the supermarket) so the speeds can be compared. The improvement becomes relatively clear.

Getting in and out, and comfort in the cockpit

I haven’t really got any better at getting in and out of the QV, and in fact my arm has started being a bit painful where I lean on it to hoist myself up, but these sort of things are fairly normal when adjusting to a new velomobile.

The Milan has a cable on the tiller so you can fix the maximum angle that it will hang down; the Quattrovelo doesn’t have this, the tiller can lie on the seat, so this meant for me that the tiller is resting on my belly. For gear changes I have to get my thumb behind the tiller. I found this position less comfortable but could not hold the tiller up with my hands as it was too much effort (as I am using my strong hand to hold up the disabled one). I will see if I can invent something to prevent the tiller from lying fully flat on my belly.

The Quattrovelo is waterproof though and this is a real bonus! It has meant I am happy to ride it to work even in the rain. Yes, you get a wet head (although if I had chosen the Alienhaube I wouldn’t even have that) but you get a bit of a wet head going by car anyway as I have to walk to my car. I am perfectly happy with how warm and dry I stay once in the VM.

A couple more test rides

It was several days before Klaus was able to ride with me because of his back, although he did take the QV out for a quick spin when I returned from choir because he didn’t think it could be that slow. His conclusion after this 15km ride was “it is about the same speed as a Strada” – which is much slower than it should be! We asked friend Jupp/Josef for advice as he had also suffered from a slow Quattrovelo at first and he gave us some ideas of what to do, such as cleaning the chain, oiling the Mountain Drive, checking tyre pressures etc.

Anyway, the following Saturday it was time for us to go for a ride together. I pumped up the tyres to 110psi (8 bar) which is usual for Durano Plus, although I had to lie the Quattrovelo on its side to pump up the tyres as otherwise I couldn’t wiggle the pump head into the right position without all the air leaking out. This is undoubtedly a situation where my technique will improve but was pretty annoying as I had to pump up one tyre 3 times.

Anyway, we set off to Geldern at a gentle pace. We went to the bridge over the A40 motorway and decided to do a roll test. This is where you hold the velomobiles on the brakes and then release the brakes and see which is fastest/goes the furthest.

The rolltest was interesting as Celeste accelerated much faster than the QV but by the end we were at about the same speed and travelled about the same distance. Millie always wins these rolltests by miles so it was yet another sign that the Quattrovelo was definitely in a slower bike league!

Riding along the cycle path the Quattrovelo was rolling better, although there was a mysterious loud noise which I eventually identified as the freehub in the back wheels.

When you roll over gravel or pieces of stick and they jump up into the wheelboxes it can be pretty noisy. I am used to this in Millie with the front wheels but the Quattrovelo has double the opportunity for pinball in the wheelboxes, but this is again something which I will get used to.

We enjoyed the ride to Geldern, taking it at a reasonable pace. We stopped for a cup of tea in Geldern and lots of people inspected our bikes.

I had to pop to the bank after this and Klaus took this pic. A bit of a shame I left the boot open!

We rode home fairly fast again and the average speed for the 50km was a respectable 22.9 km/h. The warmer temperature helped, as did oiling the chain I expect.

The following week I rode the Quattrovelo to work every day and got more used to it and its foibles. The speed was definitely improving so the bike was getting run in, and sometime during this week I decided that I would keep it. I still hadn’t bonded properly with it so hadn’t chosen a name, I was waiting to see what felt right.

The following Saturday we fixed the indicators on Millie at Ralf’s workshop. I had hoped to ride her home but it got too late so she stayed at Ralf’s. Klaus was of the opinion it was better that I didn’t have a chance to ride her as the contrast with the QV would be so strong that I might give up on the QV. I was not blind to the good points of the Quattrovelo though – luggage space, non-oily, very secure rear wheels (although it does some strange shimmies when you go over uneven ground at the back, but it is all very controlled).

The day after the indicator repair we decided to ride with Ralf on a longer tour. We decided to go to Roermond and to meet up with a couple of chums there too. We cycled to Ralf’s first to pick him up and then headed towards Roermond.

After only about 1km a very loud rattle developed in the Quattrovelo and I stopped and rummaged around in the boot in case something was rattling (although it felt like it was actually from the gears). I couldn’t find anything so carried on but stopped almost immediately again – the rattle was still there. Klaus tried the QV but wasn’t sure what I meant. We continued on but after another 500m I stopped as it sounded like I was doing serious damage to something!

Ralf and Klaus took the entire contents of my boot into their velomobiles so I had no luggage at all to rattle. Off we went, and the noise was still there, but I decided now I would have to live with it as we would be late to meet the others if we stopped any more.

After another 3km the noise gradually faded away, coming back a little when I changed gear but then disappearing again, and it was 6km before it had completely gone away. It didn’t come back, but I am none the wiser what it was. Odd.

We then had the lovely swoopy downhill road to Swalmen. Ralf went ahead in his DF, I pedalled as much as I could but the lower gearing meant I ran out of pedal power at 40 km/h. Ralf was a dot in the distance and Klaus was also ahead, but this downhill was fun for me too, although I kept thinking how brilliant it would be in the Milan.

The Quattrovelo’s gearing is lower than the Milan’s. This means I am faster to accelerate from stationary (as Millie’s lowest gear is actually pretty high and needs a lot of power) but I spin out with the Quattrovelo at 40 km/h whereas I can still pedal Millie at 60. But as I am unlikely to reach these speeds in the QV that’s not much of an issue.

We got to Roermond and met up with Oliver and Chris. Chris also has a Quattrovelo and showed us some of the things he has done, including putting acoustic foam around the gears to reduce the noise (I have now ordered some). We had lunch together, a good chat and then it was time to ride home. Chris and Oliver accompanied us for a short distance and then peeled off and the three German residents carried on towards Venlo.

Ralf and Klaus have both commented that the rear lights on the Quattrovelo are very good. I am also relieved to have a brake light; I don’t have one of these with Millie and I think it is a very important safety addition, particularly when riding in velomobile convoys which I do surprisingly regularly!

We crossed the Maas at Beesel/Reuver on the ferry.

We crossed back again at Steyl

Whilst riding through Steyl we took the cycle path which had lots of 90 degree bends. I remarked to Ralf afterwards, “I could never have done this in Millie!” Despite the Quattrovelo also having enclosed wheels, the turning circle is significantly better which is a real help.

In total I rode 101km in the Quattrovelo at an average speed of 21.4 which was an improvement on my earlier speeds (it was also a much warmer day).

Pimp my velomobile

I had been pondering over a name for the Quattrovelo for some time. It looks very like an owl so was working on owl-themed names (see the photo below for the owl similarities) during the long, long wait after my order was placed.

Klaus was keen on Athene as her familiar was an owl but I felt the QV was male. I was leaning towards some old English names for chaps who might have been racing British Racing Green cars in the 20s and 30s, so thought of Montmorency, Humphrey, Quentin… At Christmas I discussed this with my Mum and then we came up with the name Merlin which had an owl link and was a cool name. That was the top of my name choice before I met the Quattrovelo, but I knew I would have to wait until I met my actual one.

For the first two weeks I didn’t bond enough to name it, but then on the way over the hill in Grefrath whilst riding to Ralf’s for our Roermond trip I decided on the name for the Quattrovelo. I suppose it was at that point that I decided I liked it enough to keep and so I started to bond with it. And despite assuming before I collected the Quattrovelo that I would choose Merlin for the name, I actually decided at the end that Humphrey was a better choice. So Humphrey he is!

I had of course decorated the mirrors with a Union Jack (which I have subsequently redone with better quality reflectives) but I also felt it would be good to include my blog address as well, so I had ordered some lettering from eBay as well as a little flag and I fitted them.

Klaus and I rode to Kempen for a talk about Hans Jonas and Josef Goebbels, two sons of Mönchengladbach, and he took some excellent photographs of Humphrey after the event.

Another change I made was actually a rather expensive one. I have used a Garmin Oregon for the last 6-7 years (I am on my second one) and I really like it. On Millie the Oregon mount fits on the top of the tiller and it is therefore in an ideal position to see and also if I need to zoom in on the map or anything.

With the Quattrovelo, the tiller can be stashed behind the Süllrand/opening in a special area and in fact has to be in order for me to get out. However, it is impossible to fit the Oregon mount onto the tiller and still fit it behind the little tiller holder thingie.

Here is the tiller stashed behind the Süllrand:

There is very little clearance, it only just fits, thus the very thick Garmin mount had no chance.

A friend Stefan said he could 3D print me a mount to have on the right hand side front wheel arch and I said this would be great. However he was ill and didn’t have a chance to print it for a while and in the meantime I gaffer taped the Oregon mount to the relevant area and realised it was just too far away for comfortable vision, plus I had to take my eyes off the road to see it. It wasn’t a very satisfactory position.

Klaus has a Garmin Edge 1000 which has a different (very flat) mount and this fits fine on Celeste. He had a spare mount and fitted it to Humphrey so he could use his Edge when he took Humphrey out for a spin,

Here is the tiller with the Edge mount on – as you can see, it is very much flush with the grips.

It became clear to me that the only worthwhile option was to upgrade to an Edge 1000 too. So I ordered it and it arrived and I am very pleased with it so far. I will sell my Oregon as it works brilliantly and is in great condition.

Quattrovelo by sunset

I have to say, the Quattrovelo is a very good looking velomobile. As is the Milan. I pride myself on my choice of attractive velomobiles!

And here I am heading off into the distance (an unusual sight!)

Notice that this is a fairly rough road (a Wirtschaftsweg). The Quattrovelo definitely rolls more comfortably over potholey or cobbled roads compared to Millie.

My conclusions after 2 weeks of Quattrovelo ownership

I am writing this post two weeks after I collected Humphrey and having ridden 350km in him. And these are my main thoughts:

PROS

  • Very attractive velomobile; as the Germans would say, a real Hingucker
  • Good rain protection
  • Very well organised cockpit with trays both sides for  your possessions (this is part of the structural rigidity of the QV but is also handy, although needs non-slip matting)
  • Build quality seems good
  • Excellent stability at the rear, corners well and feels safe
  • Single-sided axles on all wheels so tyres can be changed without dismounting the wheels
  • Huge boot – you can chuck the kitchen sink in there and forget about it (assuming it is a lightweight kitchen sink)
  • Excellent lighting
  • Very good access to front and rear gubbins if something goes wrong (two footholes at the front and a removable panel underneath, rear gears just covered by a plastic cover – which will have soundproof foam added very soon!)
  • Gearing range is suitable for me (with a 75 tooth chainring at the front with a Mountain Drive, at the rear I have an 11 speed cassette)
  • Trigger shifter for the gears which works well
  • Drum brakes at the front (larger ones, 90mm) seem to stop me perfectly adequately. I do not regret not ordering the optional rear disc brakes
  • Schaumdeckel/foam cover keeps you warmer when riding and is also excellent to stop people getting into the velomobile when you leave it parked somewhere

CONS

  • Relatively heavy for this price level of velomobile (apparently it is 36kg and cost me just under 9000 EUR)
  • Lots of noise from the drivetrain just behind the seat
  • Also apparently noisy hubs on the back wheels (this may quieten down over time)
  • Reports of new Quattrovelos not being completely checked out before going to the customer so there are issues (my binding brake was a very minor version of this)
  • Narrows at the waist between the front and back wheels which gives much less arm space inside
  • Nothing to hold the tiller up
  • Required an additional Garmin purchase by me!
  • Strange wind whistling noise around the front visor when the wind is blowing from a certain direction
  • Front wheels throw mud on the sides just before the rear wheels. Most photos of Quattrovelos have a dirty section here.
  • When sitting in the QV it is not possible for me to get something out of the boot, such as the Schaumdeckel/foam cover or my purse.

There are obviously lots more things I could say but I will need to ride Humphrey a bit more to get a better view. However, after my 2 weeks of riding I felt that Humphrey will be a very good addition to the velomobile stable, but I will not be selling Millie just yet. If we want to have a fast ride on a nice summer’s day without carrying a lot of luggage then Millie would be the better choice. I am very lucky to have such a choice!

Next week Klaus and I are doing some touring as we have a week’s holiday from work so I will get a lot more kilometres under Humphrey’s belt and can give some reports on how I found him as a touring velomobile. Millie was a very pleasant surprise when we toured with her before, but Humphrey is a very different kettle of fish. We shall see!

An update after our tour.

We went on tour when it was minus 3 outside and slightly snowing. This isn’t ideal touring weather, but the three days and 230km gave me a good chance to get more acquainted with the Quattrovelo.

Unfortunately this tour didn’t teach me to love the Quattrovelo more. Its drawbacks (weight and narrow cockpit) become more and more irritating the more you ride. I was exhausted after relatively short rides as I just don’t have the power to propel a very heavy velomobile with a very heavy Helen in it at great speed.

What became more of an issue on the longer day rides was the lack of space for my elbows and arms. They were squashed against my body but at the same time rubbing against the sides of the velomobile. The cold was wicking through to my bones/titanium and the constant rubbing of my right elbow was getting sore. When I got back in the Milan again after the tour it was such a relief to have my arms in a comfortable position supported by the armrests (for which there is no room in the QV for me) and also the tiller being fixed higher so it does not have to be held up by me. Supporting the tiller with my right hand whilst the left (disabled) arm hangs off it leads to a lot of arm pain after a few hours.

The turning circle of the Quattrovelo was useful on the Netherlands cycle routes and the luggage capacity meant it didn’t take long each morning to stow my stuff, but these benefits were vastly outweighed by the fact it was slow and heavy and uncomfortable. It seems that my seat may also have broken (but I have to check this further).

The day after the tour I collected my Milan from Ralf’s where it has been stored for a month. What a fantastic feeling to ride in it again – fast, nimble, not quite as noisy and overall so much more comfortable for the rider. The drawbacks (low front so you scrape, massive turning circle) are not that dramatic and are far outweighed by the positives of speed and comfort.

The Quattrovelo has now been put into my other garage (500 metres away) and I will use the Milan for the next few days. When the rain comes I will swap back to the Quattrovelo, but for a dry day it seems to this rider at least that the Milan is a much better option.

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Filed under Cycling in Germany, Humphrey the Quattrovelo, Recumbent Trikes, Six Wheels In Germany

Ten Wheels In Germany – February 2018 (Month 47)

Cycling This Month

The observant amongst you may have noticed that the filename of this blog post is no longer “Six wheels in Germany” but is instead “Ten wheels in Germany”. Why? Because I have now received my brand new Quattrovelo velomobile.

I will write much more about the Quattrovelo in a post soon as I am still running it in and getting used to it, but I will put a few photos here to whet your appetites.

And no, it doesn’t yet have a name. I have a longlist of 5 and a shortlist of 2 but I am not yet decided and need to bond with it a bit further before I properly decide. Watch this space!

Oh, and as for Millie. Several people contacted me and asked about her as they were interested in buying her, including one guy who visited and said he would indeed purchase her, only to change his mind the next week. But at the moment I am happy to keep her as an alternative velomobile as I get used to the Quattrovelo. Klaus and I have to repair her indicators but are waiting for warmer weather to do this, although conveniently Ralf has offered us the use of his warm workshop and in fact Millie is already there waiting for our attention!

February was another washout in terms of distance, largely due to awful weather and also as I hurt my back (more later).

However, I still had a few chances to go riding.

This included one of our usual Sunday morning rides but this time meeting up with a chap who had contacted me some months ago. I believe Oliver reads this blog and has recently moved to Kerken which is just up the road (and through which we regularly cycle). He happened to see us when driving his car and so asked if we fancied a joint ride.

We arranged to meet between Stenden and Eyll and also asked Ralf if he would like to come, to which he agreed. The plan was for us all to meet in Stenden/Eyll but Klaus and I had a minor problem with a road closure so got to the meeting point a couple of minutes late. It didn’t matter as no-one else was there. We then heard from Ralf, that he had just put ‘Dorfstraße’ in his Garmin. It just so happens that Dorfstraße in Stenden is the longest village in NRW:

Straßendörfer sind eigentlich eine für den Niederrhein untypische Siedlungsform. So überrascht es, dass Stenden zusammen mit seiner nordwestlichen Fortsetzung im Ortsteil Eyll bei einer Länge von über 10 km wohl das längste Straßendorf Nordrhein-Westfalens darstellt.

So Ralf was at the wrong end of the village, plus there was a road closure in the middle so he would have to do some creative routing. We decided to send Klaus to pick Ralf up and I would wait for Oliver. Klaus headed off and then it began to snow, which is lovely when you are sitting stationary in a Milan without the hood.

I had a call from Oliver, he had unshipped his chain and so was just fixing it and would set off in a few minutes. We agreed that we would ride towards him and meet somewhere on the way (our meeting point was halfway between our two homes).

Klaus and Ralf returned through the snow after 10-15 minutes and we all set off towards Eyll and Nieukerk, spotting Oliver very quickly coming the other way.

He has a Milan SL (the smaller, faster version of Millie) in the most wonderful colour:

Strangely, Ralf had been really slow on this ride. We wondered if he was struggling to cope with the cold weather (he doesn’t eat many pies so doesn’t have too much insulation) but that would seem surprising. Whatever, we were constantly dropping him and having to slow down to wait. I know how awful it is when you are having a bad riding day and your compatriots disappear over the horizon. Not that we could see the horizon in the snow!

It’s a lovely ride through Eyll and then towards Nieukerk. Plan was to go to Landcafé Steudle for coffee/tea and we needed it as it was perishing cold and snowy. The snow wasn’t settling but it was still wet.

Ralf got slower and slower, then someone noticed he had a front wheel puncture. Aha! We had just 3km to go to Landcafé Steudle so he decided to ride on (it wasn’t completely flat) so we could sit somewhere warm whilst he repaired it. So going VERY slowly (maybe average of 16 at this point) we made our way to Steudle and stopped for a much needed warming cup of tea.

As Klaus and I are on low-carb we didn’t have cake but Ralf did.

We warmed ourselves through and then Ralf went out to have a look at repairing the tyre. He realised that he had not properly screwed tight the valve on his inner tube (he has a Presta or SV) and so put some air in and hoped it would hold (which it did). That was much more fun than changing a Durano Plus outside in the snow.

We rode back a different way and Oliver came with us all the way to our house (where I took the above photos of the two Milans). It was very nice to meet him and we were very impressed by his Milan. The build quality has improved (at least in terms of the looks of the carbon inside) and, as I mentioned before, the colour was fab!

It is of course great to have met a new velomobile rider in our locality and it’s always good to chat about our experiences.

I also had some messages from the new owner of Penelope. He’s been pimping her a bit and sent me the following images of new vinyl wrapping:

The colour isn’t my cup of tea but I am glad to see he is making Penelope his own (she is still called Penelope which is nice!) He has also done some more with the electrics. I hope he is enjoying riding her as much as I did!

Klaus also said goodbye to Killer his trike this month. Friend Ralf (he of the DF velomobile cookie monster fame) said he was interested in a trike so had a go on Klaus’s and decided to buy it for some fun summer riding. He came and picked it up in his van and gave Klaus some nice green pieces of paper in return.

And while I think of the Cookie Monster, I will include an amazing image that Auke van Andel did following Oliebollentocht last December. He spent hours watching various videos to work out how many velomobiles were there and to sort them by type. You can see the British flag on Millie, the Cookie Monster on Ralf’s DF and even that Klaus is wearing a white snowboarding helmet in Celeste!

Velomobile riding is fun and we meet lots of friends. But February was also an incredibly sad time as fellow Velomobile ride Robert Frischemeier (Liegender Robert) died suddenly following an infection. His illness ran its course over just one week and we were all so shocked to hear of his death, a super fit man of just 58 who commuted 90km per day to and from work and did lots of longer tours for fun. It was tragic news to hear we had lost him.

His family invited his velomobile friends to come to the funeral in all our cycling colourfulness and then to accompany Robert’s urn on its final journey to the cemetery. Of course we wanted to go!

We offered our couch to anyone coming long distance but in the end it was early on the Friday morning that our ‘guest’ arrived. She was looking for somewhere to park and then to ride her Leitra with us the 22km to the church for the funeral. Klaus and I had taken the day off work, as had Jochen and Ralf and Hartmut, so it was a group of 5 velomobiles and 1 upright bike that set off eastwards to Duisburg at 8:30 in the morning on a Friday. Ute’s Leitra is a fairly slow velomobile but due to the strong wind Hartmut was having a tough time on his upright bike. It was a beautiful clear day but bitingly cold with a strong wind, which would make us feel cold pretty much the whole day!

We arrived at the church and went to the room set aside for us with hot drinks and croissants/Brezel. People had cycled from all over to be there. Ymte came from Dronten in NL, TimB and Christoph from Bodensee (by car with folding bikes in the back) and there were many others from Bonn, Cologne etc. In total I counted 25 velomobiles which was a lovely tribute to Robert.

The funeral service was enlivened by Robert’s granddaughter walking around but was overall a very sombre occasion. Robert’s daughter said some incredibly moving words.

After the funeral it was time to cycle in convoy to the cemetery.

There was another short service by the priest and then we walked to where the urn would be buried. In such freezing cold temperatures it was tough to stand outside in cycle clothing but there were some rays of sun to warm us a little.

After the burial some of us decided to cycle to a café in Uerdingen which was just 4km away. Our group ended up being about 8 people, although once we got to the café two carried on. We went into Marktcafé (where Klaus and I often visit) and sat down. A few minutes later the contingent who had cycled to the funeral from Köln and environs stopped as well and they joined us. It was another good opportunity to speak about Robert, how we knew him and how his death had affected us.

Eventually it was time to ride home. The group had now shrunk to Klaus, me, Ralf and Ute and we wended our way back to my flat where Ralf helped Ute put the Leitra in her trailer and then rode home; we spent some time chatting with Ute who we had seen at a few other events. More thoughts again about Robert, dying at such a young age, and that we should not put off things that are really important to us as no-one knows how much time they have.

My condolences once again to the family and friends of Robert Frischemeier; he was a very special man who will be sadly missed.

Other events this month

Klaus and I went on another away weekend for some culture.

This time we decided to go to Regensburg despite it being a very long way away (6 hours’ driving at least) as we fancied having a look around and maybe listening to the cathedral choir there.

Unfortunately the afternoon before we left I somehow pinged my back which meant it was very painful. I sat around with hot water bottles and hoped that the Regensburg trip would be OK. We set off and the heated seats in Klaus’s car were great, but each time we stopped for a break it was almost impossible for me to get out of the car. When I did, and started walking towards the motorway service station, my back would painfully lock up for a few seconds. I was like a very old woman!

The journey was fairly fast with no major traffic hold ups so we arrived in Regensburg at 6pm. We checked into the hotel which was basic but nice. I couldn’t face walking any distance so we just went downstairs to the Indian restaurant under the hotel. The meal was OK but not as special as some!

I had a very bad night’s sleep but the next morning I could move marginally better. We had breakfast in the hotel but this was not very good for the low carb diet (two boiled eggs each and a yoghurt, except I didn’t like the yoghurt). We had paid extra for the breakfast so asked to cancel it for the following two days – we would find some scrambled egg in a café somewhere.

After some paracetamol my back unfroze enough that we could have a bit of a walk around but it was very painful.

Regensburg is a lovely old city that had relatively minor damage in the war, and it is a very popular tourist destination in Germany. Fortunately in mid-February with a bit of snow on the ground it was not too heaving with people.

We visited the Dom (Cathedral) and had a look around, it was lovely. Opposite the cathedral was a hat shop and we went in there (I like hats and am searching for the perfect winter hat as my 25 year old one is a bit mangy) but the prices were a bit exciting. We weren’t allowed to handle the hats ourselves, a sales lady chose for me and put them on my head, but the cheapest I tried on was 170 EUR which is a bit steep for a hat. Especially as the one I was wearing (a black felt number) I had bought a few weeks before from Accessorize reduced from 30 EUR to 3 EUR (bargain!).

We bought Klaus a couple of jumpers in Kaufhof and then stopped for lunch at a very nice restaurant. We looked at the cakes but had soup and salad which were very nice. We considered going there for breakfast the next morning but they were only open at 10 and I wanted to go to the Mass in the Dom at 10am to hear the Regensburger Domspatzen (choir).

We walked to see the Donau but my back meant it was too tricky to walk much so we had a fairly relaxing day overall.

In the evening we both fancied a steak so Klaus googled somewhere to eat and we ended up walking to a very nice Spanish restaurant. The food was excellent and they provided us with additional vegetables instead of potatoes which was great. It had a very good atmosphere and we really enjoyed it.

On the way back Klaus took this very nice photo of the Dom behind some other buildings.

We had decided to check out of the hotel the next day and go home early (Sunday, rather than the planned Monday) because my back was really limiting what we could do.

The following morning we headed off to find breakfast – which was surprisingly tricky! In Regensburg on Sunday mornings nothing much is happening and we walked around for quite a while before we found an open café. Even the bakeries were shut! I guess this is a Bavarian thing. Anyway, we found the café Charlotte and had some scrambled egg there. Klaus stayed drinking his coffee whilst I went off to the Mass to hear the choir.

I sneaked into the back of the cathedral and found a seat but ended up only staying for half an hour as it was so cold in there, and the seat was also freezing cold, that my back was complaining more, even though it had definitely improved. So I left (having not heard the choir do a solo piece, but there were only 12 or so of them there anyway) and Klaus walked back with me to the hotel. We collected the car and headed off, having an incredibly smooth and easy journey without a single traffic hold up.

The hotel were very nice and refunded us the cost of the night we didn’t stay there. Regensburg was nice and we might visit again but it is a bit of a long way away!

Randomness

On Valentines Day Klaus and I went for a meal in our favourite restaurant in Wachtendonk, called Buskens. The landlord is always very chatty and we talked a lot about skiing (he was about to go on a ski holiday) and too much traffic in Wachtendonk centre.

There happened also to be a British couple from somewhere in the north of England in the restaurant so we chatted to them. When they left the chap said to us “I imagine you haven’t had these in Germany” and handed us a Creme Egg each!

Creme Eggs don’t really work for the low carb diet so they are still in the cupboard. My Mum is visiting in April so I think she might get lucky!

My assistant at work, Nasim, has been providing cakes (through a friend) which have made occasional appearances in my blog. Our boss had his 65th birthday and we had a meal at a restaurant for all the colleagues (also a delayed Christmas meal) and Nasim had arranged two cakes for Thomas…

My colleague Dorothee had a birthday also and another cake was organised for her too!

She bought in some cakes too. I had a tiny, tiny corner of the Frankfurter Kranz – my piece fitted on a teaspoon!

Although cakes are off the menu at the moment (except for my Keto Cake, see below!), Gudula and Frank invited us to a Raclette evening. This is not something I had seen in the UK – you have a heated grill and have little shovels that you can put food on, then cover in special Raclette cheese and it slowly cooks, whilst you cook some meat on the top. There was a large variety of things to cook and we had a very nice evening!

Keto Recipes

I have been trying to find some good Keto (low carb) desserts and have tried an awful lot of things that I don’t like, but here are my recipes for two things that seem to work well.

Keto Käse-Sahne Torte

Ingredients for 8 portions:

For the base

  • 90g almond flour (Mandelmehl) or finely-chopped almonds
  • 10g 85% dark chocolate
  • 45g butter
  • 15g Stevia or Erythrit sweetener

For the topping

  • 500g Quark
  • 200g whipping cream (Schlagsahne)
  • 40g Stevia/Erythrit sweetener
  • 9g/1 sachet powdered gelatine
  • Vanilla essence
  • Lemon juice

Method

  1. Line with baking parchment and grease a small springform tin. I use one that is 16cm diameter.
  2. Slowly melt the butter and chocolate together.
  3. Stir in the almond flour and sweetener
  4. Press into the tin and put in the fridge to set.

Then for the topping (preferably after an hour or so, so the base has set)

  1. Make up the gelatine as per instructions (for my gelatine it is 4-6 dessert spoons of cold water and the gelatine mixed and then very slowly heated until it all dissolves)
  2. Mix the Quark, Stevia, vanilla essence and lemon juice in a large bowl.
  3. Whip the cream until it is stiff.
  4. Once the gelatine has dissolved, add 1 large spoonful of the Quark mix into the gelatine and stir until it is mixed in, then add everything back into the Quark mix and stir thoroughly until it is all mixed through.
  5. Fold the whipped cream in carefully.
  6. Spread on top of the base in the springform and chill for at least 4 hours.

This is very tasty and when divided into 8 portions is just 4g net carbs and 293 calories per slice.

I am afraid I haven’t taken a very good photo of it – this is what it looks like after half the cake has been eaten and I took it out of the springform a bit early (it hadn’t absolutely set):

Mascarpone Mousse

We eat this all the time and it couldn’t be easier!

Ingredients:

  • 40g mascarpone
  • 40g whipping cream
  • 5g Stevia sweetener
  • Lemon to taste if desire, or 2g cocoa powder

Method:

  1. Put all the ingredients into a bowl and mix until stiff. Then eat!

This is 2g net carbs and 300 calories and is very tasty, also with raspberries, blueberries or strawberries.

Seen on the Internet

I like spotting long German words in the wild and here is another on the Velomobilforum:

And this is a classic! I should probably try to get lots of friends to say this, it sounds almost impossible to British ears.

The last week of February was appalling weather with temperatures of -7 when I cycled to work (in the Quattrovelo) but I am happy to be back riding (now I have a waterproof velomobile) and look forward to the better weather which should come soon.

We have a one week bike tour later in March and haven’t yet decided entirely where we are going, perhaps pootling northwards in Germany, perhaps a bit of NL, who knows. We will take it easy as we are both unfit!

I will continue working on my Quattrovelo blog post and will publish that soon.

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Six Wheels in Germany – December 2017 (Month 45)

So 2017 is at an end! This is a little something I wrote over the New Year 2017/2018:

I’m not the sort of person who looks back the whole time and lives on memories. Generally I feel happy with all my life choices so far and I appreciate the wonderful times I have had with family, friends and James over the last 46 years.

But a quick look back at last year shows that it was very different than I had expected!

I started the year relatively newly divorced but used to being on my own and happy with my own company (well, Poppy was also part of this!) I love living with the Roddays and find my life in Germany is peaceful and fun. Work was continuing its usual challenges but as I started 2017 my main focus was on trying to lose some weight and being a support to Klaus who was going through an incredibly tough time at home.

And then the path of 2017 rather changed as Klaus separated from his wife. As his closest friend I was happy to support him through this huge life earthquake and more time together confirmed what had been clear for a while really, that we could become a really good partnership. Our relationship developed quickly and we were soon planning to take a cycle tour together in June. This became a wonderful focus for 2017, a two week 1900km tour to Usedom on the Baltic Sea, then to Berlin, and then back. It was a fantastic life experience and my cycling partner was, as always, excellent company. On our return Klaus moved in with me.

There was lots of Velomobile activity over 2017, including our friend Ralf buying a DF and friend Hartmut making further investigations as to whether he should join the Velomobile gang. We took part in many group cycle rides with the ADFC and with others, finishing the year with the Oliebollentocht in Rotterdam with more than 100 velomobiles.

Klaus and I had several trips in the car too, to England for my hospital appointment and again for Christmas, to Dresden, to Berlin… all great fun and a chance to see a bit more of Germany or the UK without having to turn the pedals!

Looking forward to 2018, I have made few plans. One plan is to lose the 20kg extra that I put on this year (!!!!!!) so that I can fit in my Quattrovelo when it becomes available in February. This involves the low carb diet again and no cakes for the time being. Another plan is to increase my mileage, I want to make 10.000km this year, having managed less than 8.000km in 2017. Klaus and I have plans for 3 multi-day bike tours, one with Ralf, and we will also no doubt do some more trips in the car. I am developing plans to take my Mum to visit the bench in memory of my father on the Isle of Mull in Scotland. I will also be working full time, at least for the first couple of months of 2018, so must fit my social events in around that!

2018 will hopefully be one of health and fresh air and time spent with friends and family. Klaus and I are both enjoying the simple life, a chance to live within our means, to not buy unnecessary fripperies and to value what we have. With the uncertainty around Brexit and politics in general, it is good to have people with whom you can relax and be peaceful, and we have many good friends here.

I am looking forward to 2018 and wish you all a happy and blessed year!

Cycling

The statistics speak for themselves… this year I have not done so much cycling!

I hope to achieve a bit more next year, but there were reasons why this year fell rather short of my target.

The Kempen ADFC group had arranged a Nikolaustour (cycle ride) at the beginning of December but there was such a heavy snowfall that we all drove in our cars instead to the venue where we were stopping for tea and cake.

Hartmut had provided a very attractive advent wreath based on a bicycle wheel and with remote control LED candles.

We also found ourselves on a cycle ride on Silvester (New Year’s Eve) as Hartmut realised the Fit Durch Den Winter tour had been advertised in the Rad am Niederrhein magazine although it had been run on another date. He felt he ought to do the ride anyway and asked if anyone else was about. In the end no unexpected people turned up, it was just the usual suspects, but we had a nice ride around St Tönis to Vorst where we stopped at Papperlapapp for tea and cake.

In the café was this excellent sign which ably demonstrates my concept for the year!


(Cake doesn’t make you fat, it just stretches out all the creases)

Unfortunately it is incorrect, cakes have made me fat (along with other things of course) so I shall have to eat a lot less in 2018!

Oliebollentocht

Arguably the biggest event of the year for Velomobiles, the annual Oliebollentocht (cycle ride with Dutch Oliebollen doughnutty things),hart was in my diary from the beginning of the year as something not to miss. In 2016 there were 260 velomobiles, we looked forward very much to the Rotterdam 2017 version.

As Klaus and I were in the UK and coming back via Hoek van Holland/Rotterdam we arranged our return trip so that we arrived on the morning of Oliebollentocht. Ralf had very kindly offered to take our velomobiles to Rotterdam in a trailer and with friend Rolf along too it was a very full trailer!

Ralf and Rolf (also with Hartmut who came along for the ride) arrived way before Klaus and I as the border control out from the Ferry took forever. But we arrived in due course, helped get the VMs out of the trailer and then added them to the large selection parked in front of the trucker’s diner which was our base for the day.

Hartmut (on the right in the yellow/green waterproofs) was having a good look around before cycling off to visit his son. He is very interested in Velomobiles and this is about the best opportunity to get a look at a lot of them!

Hartmut appears in most of the photos and videos of the day, peering at various Velomobiles. Keep an eye out for him if you watch any OBT videos!

We were given armbands to wear which enabled us to have free tea and coffee and food that had been arranged. You can see that I have already got very oily from Millie after just being with her for 5 minutes!

Klaus and I had an omelette for breakfast at the café as we had nothing on the boat, caught up with friends and then we all rolled out on the ride of 63km which went along the Oude Maas via Portugaal before heading up to the heart of Rotterdam.

We stopped for cake at the restaurant Prachtig next to the Erasmus Bridge.

(Please note that some of the photos below are mine but others are from Klaus from Köln or Birger Landuyt, and possibly other Forum members)

We had some apple cake and tea.

Then it was time to leave.

Because Rotterdam has lots of traffic lights and pedestrians it was decided we would leave in groups of up to 10 velomobiles, so the guy in the dark green and cream Quattrovelo was our group leader. Klaus and I had already seen this Quattrovelo in Dronten and I had also seen it at SPEZI – it was the cause of my colour choice for my QV!

It was quite stop/start through the town and it was very hard to keep the group together. In fact, we didn’t succeed, and it split into various groups. Fortunately I had the route on my Garmin, as did others, as I wouldn’t have known where to go without as our leaders were often out of sight. The traffic lights take a long time!

The entire way around Rotterdam we were being filmed and photographed by people. It’s not often you see 100 jellybeans cycling around a major city!

Klaus spotted this photo amongst the thousands people have posted online – it is Millie and Celeste crossing the road.

I found myself leading a group of Velomobiles after a while as there was a younger girl who was not able to ride as fast so we kept pace with her and eventually my little group of 6 velomobiles grew to a larger group as we returned to the starting point. It was really fun riding in such a big group although quite tricky in the town, and there had unfortunately been one Quest/bollard interface at the beginning of the ride, plus another minor bump in Rotterdam centre.

We returned to the truck stop and whilst it was still light loaded up the trailer with the four velomobiles again. Here is Ralf practising his yoga.

Then it was time for the pea soup and Oliebollen (which shockingly I didn’t photograph!) and catching up with more friends again. It was good to meet Andrew Allen for the first time at OBT although it was sad to hear his tale of woe about his trip (he was taken out by a white van near Colchester on his way to the ferry and had to continue without his DF, mainly as he was collecting his new Quattrovelo). He discovered on the Rotterdam tour that the gearing on his new QV was too high and would have to delay his return to the UK to find an alternative sprocket for his Rohloff as these things are not so easy to get in the UK. I hope he had some success!

We had been lucky with clear weather although it was bitingly cold. It was a relief to be in the warm trucker’s restaurant with soup and tea. Ralf and Rolf headed off home pulling the trailer and Klaus and I left 15 minutes later. We had time to empty Klaus’s car of our week’s luggage from our England trip before the trailer arrived and we unloaded Millie and Celeste.

There are many videos on YouTube about Oliebollentocht 2017, it’s worth a watch if you have some spare time!

Thanks again to Ralf for transporting our velomobiles and for the organisers of Oliebollentocht for putting on such a fun event. We will be there again in 2018!

Life in Germany

Life in Germany continues much the same… I have been here over three and a half years now so am well settled in. But there are still always some interesting events each month!

In December we had a fair bit of snowfall. Most arrived on Sunday which was good as I didn’t have to drive (I don’t have much experience in driving in snow). Poppy investigated it in the garden but was cheesed off that I made her wear her fleece when we went out for a walk.

It had all cleared by the next morning and I drove to work on normal roads. But during the morning it snowed again so I had to clear the car before driving home!

More changes to our flat

Having an extra person in the flat means that we need to be a bit more organised with storage so I decided to buy a couple of sideboards. These arrived in 6 parcels altogether, each parcel weighing 30kg or more, but fortunately the delivery company carried them up the stairs into the lounge for us!

So one Saturday morning Klaus decided to start building the two sideboards, from the company Dänisches Bettenlager. They were called ‘Goliath’ which is pronounced totally different in German than English so we have had quite a lot of amusement over the names.

Anyway, he made a start:

He was ably assisted, as always, by Poppy:

Very complicated bags of screws, bolts, dowels, tacks and more…

But in just 2 hours Goliath Number 1 was complete!

Goliath Number 2 took less time as we were now experienced!

They remain relatively empty of items at the moment as we haven’t got round to sorting stuff out, but they will undoubtedly fill up soon enough!

Work

This month I spent a lot of time thinking about whether I would increase my working hours to full time, at the request of the company. I thought long and hard and decided in the end to offer to work full time but with the proviso that if it became possible to return to part time I would do this as soon as possible. It was all agreed with my boss and so from 2 January 2018 I will be working full time. A bit of a change of pace for me, but I hope it will only be for a few months.

I have an assistant at work, a young chap from Bangladesh called Nasim, and he is very friendly. He noticed that we have cakes at work and so arranged for cakes to be made for Annette and I in the Bangladeshi style (except with less sugar as they like their cakes extra-sweet). How about these!

My colleague Annette regularly brings in a selection of cakes for us to enjoy during our meetings.

And the Quality Assurance representative of my customer also brought us cakes from Poland one day!

Nasim and I also had a visit from Nikolaus on 6 December

Christmas in England

Klaus and I booked to go to England for Christmas to stay with my mother. We travelled over on 21 December on the overnight ferry which was very packed!

As I had a lot of Stena reward points I treated us to an upgrade on the cabin – with a window and no bunkbeds! Also a free mini bar although we weren’t very hungry so didn’t get much value out of that.

We arrived by 8 in the morning and had a very relaxing few days with Mum before the busyness of Christmas. This included going to the village carol concert and I also went to my old church in Colchester for their Sunday morning service on Christmas Eve. After this service we went for a walk at Walton on the Naze near the Naze Tower – it was very blowy!

But we spent a lot of time hanging out at Mum’s house relaxing, chatting and making use of her fibre broadband!

We were treated to a beautiful day as well which showed her 450 year old house off at its best.

We celebrated Christmas Day with my Mum and her next door neighbours, plus some friends. We had good food (of course) and a very relaxing time.

On Boxing Day we had such beautiful weather Klaus and I decided to go to the sea again and this time went to Aldeburgh on the Suffolk coast.

The beach is stony but large and we had a good walk along.

We passed a fish smokery so purchased a fish pie each.

As the sign says, any fresher and it would still be swimming!

Whilst we were buying the fish pie I noticed some people with strange hats and bells on their legs – yes, the Morris Dancers were here! I explained it briefly to Klaus and we waited to watch the beginning of their dancing. Another example of English eccentricity for him!

Further along the beach there is a giant shell which is artwork to do with Benjamin Britten.

We walked back and then awarded ourselves a cream tea at a hotel in Aldeburgh.

We very much enjoyed our time with my Mum and took the overnight ferry back again (this time in a cheaper cabin with bunkbeds and no window!), arriving the next morning in Rotterdam for Oliebollentocht.

Silvester/New Year’s Eve

As a dog owner, New Year’s Eve in Germany is never much fun. We knew the fireworks would start at midnight and go on for an hour or so, and that meant an hour of Poppy barking. But we decided to go out to an organ concert a few hours beforehand (9:30pm in Kempen).

And this is what we heard.

It was a great concert and the organ in the Propsteikirche is obviously very decent. We will look out for more concerts there.

Randomness

Who says Germans have no sense of humour?

Another item of randomness. I was at a party celebrating the 50th birthday of Klaus’s friend and colleague and we were serenaded by a bagpiper!

There has been a cheddar famine in Aldi for the last couple of months (apparently a production issue, not that they are no longer doing it). Fortunately Lidl had a special offer on Cheddar which was also very good.

Cakes this month

As these are the last cakes I will be having for some time I thought I would display them full size in their glory!

Starting with some Krapfen made by Rohallah who lives with Gudula and Frank. They were fantastic!!

So that’s the end of 2017, see you in 2018!!!

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Six Wheels in Germany – November 2017 (Month 44)

Cycling this month

Another low mileage month. In fact, it looks highly unlikely that I will reach my year’s target of 8000km and so will be the lowest year’s cycling total since I started recumbenteering ten years ago.

But do you know what? I don’t mind. This year has been massively different in my life with a new relationship with Klaus, him moving in with me, us beginning our lives together, plus a more-and-more stressful work environment for me as my workload increases. If I have to cycle less then so be it. But I do hope to get out on the bike more next year!

And here is where I went this month:

A trip to a local coffee shop

Klaus had visited alone a coffee shop in Uerdingen and said it would be nice for me to also go there as it had its own charm. So we headed off on our bikes to Beans & Sweets on a cold and slightly mizzly day, although the sun came out once we got there.

The café was full but we found a space on a table occupied by a lone female. The table was made from some old railway furniture where the seat folds out. It was rather creaky and wobbly so I was a bit wary of it!

I chose cheesecake

Klaus made the better choice, a kind of biscuity creamy cakey thing.

It was only 45km but I wasn’t on very good form so found it harder work than usual!

Penelope goes to a new home

I recently wrote on this blog that I planned to sell Penelope. I put an advert in the German Velomobilforum and had several people interested, including a relatively local chap who came to try her out but wasn’t keen on the colour. However, I was contacted by another chap, Thomas, who was very keen and made arrangements to get the train to Kempen and to ride her home if he bought her.

So Thomas duly arrived and I picked him up from the station. He had a look at Penelope and we adjusted her seat position etc to suit her, and he decided to have her after a couple of short test rides.

He had bought rather a lot of luggage with him – this is because he planned to cycle the 360km home to south east of Mannheim, a massively long journey even for someone used to recumbent trikes as he was.

I gave him a free spiked tyre for Penelope and then he handed over just six small pieces of paper to take Penelope away, but at least they were also purple!

He set off at about 2 in the afternoon, using his phone as a GPS (he had a backup battery but I was unsure it would last the whole way).

Here is is, just about to go:

I heard from him the next day that he had stopped after 270km and got a friend to pick him up as he was so tired. But what an incredibly impressive first ride on Penelope, and I hope he has loads of fun riding her around his rather hillier town!

I also now need to do some new artwork for the top of this page – Millie and Alfie are my only bikes remaining. But not for long…

Life in Germany

A weekend in Dresden

Following on from our trip to Potsdam, Berlin and Usedom in October, we had booked flights for a weekend in Dresden. The idea was to go on the mid-afternoon flight on Friday and fly back Sunday evening. We booked with Eurowings, found an apartment right near the centre of Dresden and then investigated car parking at Düsseldorf airport.

Then we had an email from Eurowings saying because of not enough passengers they now had a smaller plane and we would be returning on a different flight, to Köln this time. This was hopeless for us as we would be back stupidly late, plus have really complicated travel for which we would have to apply for compensation. Stress. So instead we cancelled the flights (and got a full refund) and decided to go by car instead!

It’s a drive of at least six hours but Klaus does it fairly regularly for work anyway, and his car is comfy and his diesel is free! Hurrah!

He took the day off work and came and picked me up from my workplace on the dot of 1pm and we set off eastwards… being stuck in all the Friday afternoon traffic as we headed through the Ruhr, but we expected that. It was a bit rainy and dark which meant the journey wasn’t as fast as it could be but we were stocked up with Gummibärchen and Klaus’s music system was playing his entirely playlist by song in alphabetical order. We tried to guess how many songs would start with “N” and what those songs were. Needless to say, we were not very accurate at this game!

We stopped for a Burger King on the way (Klaus’s favourite) and finally arrived at our hotel at 8pm. There was underground parking available but for some reason the gate wasn’t opening and as I stood outside talking to the intercom the heavens opened and I ended up looking like a drowned rat. But we had a parking spot in the centre of Dresden – and the car next to us had a Viersen number plate!

Our apartment was very spacious and even had a washing machine! But first things first, we headed off for tea and cake.

We stopped at the Kufürstenhof right opposite the Marienkirche in the centre of Dresden. Everything was very nicely set out. I tried this cake which had an interesting name (which I cannot now remember) but had meringue, jam, cream and pistachios.

Klaus went for this apple cake.

Suitably fortified after our long drive, we walked around a little looking in various shop windows. Initial impressions were that Dresden has a lot of watch shops. Further impressions were that Dresden has a LOT of watch shops, Dresden has OODLES of watch shops and Dresden has VAST QUANTITIES of watches for sale. Posh ones too. The most pricey we saw was 129,000€. Which is a lot.

The next morning, Saturday morning, we headed off to breakfast at a café round the corner. We had a few plans of what to do with the day, which included a boat trip along the Elbe.

But first we did some more walking around, seeing the sights. Klaus had been in Dresden some weeks beforehand so acted as my guide to show me around.

I had been thinking about getting a new winter coat and Klaus turns out to be an excellent personal shopper. We found the perfect winter coat in Karstadt and the price was fair so I was sorted! My grey hat doesn’t match it so that is my next challenge, finding a similar wool boater but in black. Not so easy!

In order to fortify ourselves for the boat trip we had some cake.

The boat trip was with a firm who have paddle wheel steamships but unfortunately we were on a rather more modern one.

It went along the river to the south east, past some very posh residential areas with palaces and castles. The architecture of Dresden was lovely, especially when you realise most of it has been built since World War 2 after the firebombing of Dresden by the Allies.

After the ship it was time for our next event which we had spotted the evening before – a service of Vespers in the Kreuzkirche including organ music. It was free entry but 3€ for a programme, and we had a 45 minute service consisting mostly of the Dresdner Kreuzchor singing. This choir has been going for seven centuries. They were very impressive, as was the organ, although where we were seated and with the acoustics of the building the organ was a bit overwhelming at times.

We finished our evening with a meal at a steak restaurant which offered Worcestershire Sauce Dresden Style!

We did some more walking after our meal, some more window shopping at watches (we both like them so this was fun) and then found ourselves near the Semperoper and stopped for some dessert cake. Klaus went for this.

And I chose this option. It had lots of fruit on so was very healthy.

After a busy day with lots of impressions we went back to our apartment. In the dark we could see into the windows of the building next to us – the Transport museum – and once I discovered it was open the next day (Sunday) that became our plan for Sunday morning before we left to drive home.

The next morning, after breakfast in the café we had another wander around and then checked out of our hotel. We were able to leave the car in the car park whilst we looked around the  Transport Museum.

They had lots of older vehicles and many from the time of East Germany including Trabants and Wartburgs, of course. It was interesting to see a museum on transport history with the view from the former communist East.

Klaus and I rather laughed at this graphic though – a fellow Velomobilist recently cycled from Hamburg to Berlin in 5 hours 20 minutes.

They also had this enormous bicycle!

That wheel is rather dwarfing the bottle dynamo.

Here it is in all its glory!

This was also good news, although sadly inaccurate for me I fear!

It is more likely that I burn 300-400 calories per hour, so that’s not even one cake!

UK museums are a bit more interested in Health & Safety. In this museum you could try various bikes around the track which went around one medium-sized room. We were impressed that they had a recumbent bicycle in there, and then discovered a trike. So we both had a go.

 

Klaus’s Facebook message about it had a brilliant autocorrect from his misbehaving phone for the word ‘gesehen’ (‘seen’). It was a Sunday morning and I was not at church so I guess I was rather heathen!

The museum had trains and boats too, so we had a good look around for a couple of hours and then it was time to head home.

Klaus had fancied walking along the Elbe for a little but after lots of standing and walking in the Museum our backs were protesting so instead we drove along the river. After a while we spotted a sign to Glashütte. This is a town where lots of watches are made and as we had been in what appeared to be the Watch City we decided to do the 20km detour to Glashütte. My watch, that I bought in memory of my father, also came from Glashütte (from the firm Mühle Glashütte).

It turned out to be up a rather winding road through some attractive scenery (despite the rain) and, being Sunday, when we got there everything was shut. But we saw the huge posh buildings belonging to Lange & Söhne as well as the other big Glashütte brands.

From here to get back to the motorway was a bid fiddly as we had actually been going in the opposite direction to where we needed to go and also gone up into the mountains (Erzgebirge) a bit. But eventually we were back on the main motorway and passing Dresden again, heading for home. We passed signs to Colditz castle; I visited it years ago with my Father and James and would like to go again one day. Klaus hadn’t heard of it – it’s obviously British WW2 history rather than German!

It was raining all the way back but we had a run with less traffic and were home at 7 in the evening. We stopped halfway – Klaus had a McDonalds Burger and I had something more to my taste:

We had had a brilliant weekend – you can pack a lot in over two days and we certainly saw a lot. Dresden is lovely and I hope to go back there again before too long.

Choir performances

I sing in the Willich Choir which is linked to the Evangelische Kirche in Willich. This year we were doing Paulus by Mendelssohn-Bartholdy and I grew to really love this music the more we sang it.

Our two performances were two days apart in November. The first, in Anrath, didn’t go as well as it could have done (in my view), partly because of the tricky acoustics. The second performance, in the Friedenskirche in Krefeld, was much better.

I sat right behind a guy with a Contra-Bassoon. It’s an amazing  instrument, sound like deep organ pipes and looks very complicated!

Here is the local newspaper report (in German of course) for the Friday concert in Anrath: Anrath report and here is the report from Krefeld: Krefeld report.

Next year we will be doing Joshua by Handel. I am looking forward to it already!

Some more cakes

We had a number of shorter rides this year with a cake as the goal. Here are the results of our travails:

I had this rice cake (and Klaus the apple cake in the background) in Arcen in the Netherlands. We went for a ride and then friend Ralf with his new DF Velomobile said he was heading our way, so we waited for him (not a hardship in a nice warm café with cake) and then rode back together.

My colleague Annette kindly shared some pastries with me at work one day!

On another occasion the ADFC Fit durch den Winter tour went to a café about 11km away. Unfortunately I had pulled a muscle in my back so couldn’t cycle but Klaus did. I went by car with the dog and met them there and had this very tasty Mandarinen-Schmand Kuchen.

A puzzling time…

When winter arrives and it’s less appealing to go walking or cycling I like to fill up some time by doing a jigsaw puzzle, so I bought a new one for November and made a start.

It became clear, however, that the piece of board I do the puzzle on was too small. Fortunately Gudula had a frameless frame available in the cellar and I could use the perspex on it as a larger work area. It was quite flexible so I used the old hardboard base to strengthen it from underneath. And the puzzle starts to take shape.

A day later and you can begin to see what it is…

And here it is finally finished!

I shall start another one during the Christmas break from work – I get two weeks off at Christmas, hurrah! I will be visiting the UK for part of that time with Klaus.

A work visit.

I work as a Key Account Manager at a Kempen firm and my Account is a Russian customer. I speak daily on the phone to this customer (in English, fortunately!) and also to an organisation in Bavaria with whom we partner on this contract.

In the last week in November we discovered a delegation from Russia and Bavaria would come to visit us for several days – from Thursday to Sunday. Unfortunately I already had appointments on Friday afternoon and the whole of Saturday but was able to meet the visitors at other times.

Thursday I went with them for an inventory at a warehouse we use locally and got to know the three representatives from Russia and the chap from Bavaria. We had a meal together that evening in Kempen. The next day they were with me in the office in the morning and then I met them again for dinner in the evening which was great fun. We had a really enjoyable evening, chatting in four languages (English, German, Russian and Polish) because of the mix of nationalities we had amongst us.

On Sunday morning I met my main counterpart in Russia for cake as she has read this blog for many months and so knows about my cake experiences.

I had this rice cake.

Klaus went for his favourite Käse-Sahne Torte.

Julia from Russia chose this Black Forest Gateau.

We had a lovely chinwag. Having spoken to her loads on the phone for the last fifteen months it was really good to get to know her in person. And, even more of a bonus, she had brought me some Russian chocolates!

It seems I have an invitation to visit the company in Moscow so maybe one day I will manage it – it would be great fun!

It’s been a tiring month work-wise for both Klaus and me. He was away in Nürnberg for a week which involves lots of travelling and standing around at the Trade Fair. I ended up having to do some extra work due to workload, plus I had a few days off sick at the beginning of the month which involved various tests at the doctors (all was fine in the end). The grey and cold weather that Germany is now experiencing isn’t very cosy either, but the Advent season is upon us now and I am looking forward to seeing my Mum and Sister and her family in the UK, as well as Oliebollentocht 2017 Velomobile gathering in Rotterdam just after Christmas. Watch this space!

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Filed under Millie the Milan GT Carbon, Penelope the Velomobile, Recumbent Trikes, Six Wheels In Germany

Six Wheels In Germany – October 2017 (Month 43)

Cycling this month

October was better than September but still nothing to write home about in terms of distance!

The weather was a bit better on a few occasions so I had a chance for a couple of longer rides.

One Sunday morning I went for a ride with Klaus and we planned to meet Ralf (who was cycling home from Goch to the north). We agreed to meet at Café zum Schafstall near Twisteden as they do very good cakes.

Klaus had done a 200km ride the day before (I was at the all-day practice for my choir) but his legs were still good. Mine were surprisingly good too so we made very fast time and ended up extending our route before arriving at the Café as we would have been 45 minutes early. We ended up passing Ralf on his way there so slowed down to ride with him – and as he was on a heavy upright bike with panniers it was slowing down by about 12km/h. This will all change now as he has just collected his new DFXL Velomobile (more on that later).

We rode with Ralf to the café and had a nice piece of cake. Ralf had brought along his Garmin Oregon 700 which he doesn’t use any more. I was thinking about upgrading (because you can upload tracks via bluetooth and don’t need to plug into a computer) so he is letting me borrow it for a few weeks to see how I like it.

We were having a nice chinwag and it seemed rude not to have a second round of cakes so we did so. This triggered our rule that you have to ride 50km per slice of cake so Klaus and I knew we would have to detour on the way home again to make the 100km, but this was pretty easy. We rode back with Ralf at what was for us a very leisurely pace (20 km/h) but which was a real workout for him with his heavy bike. He will be leaving us for dust within a few weeks of course…

Two days later I took myself out for an afternoon ride and headed to Xanten, not following my pre-prepared track but just seeeing what looked interesting on the Garmin. I chose to ride along the Römerstraße which is an old Roman Road which I thought would be straight (mostly) and flat (sadly not). It was enough of an incline that I could test my Schlumpf Mountain Drive repair from Klaus (brand new buttons) and hurrah, it seems to have done the trick!

Here is the view along that road.

I stopped for cake in Xanten but felt a bit odd sitting on my own at a café. It’s much more fun with my usual riding partner!

Poor Jochen had a bit of misfortune this month. On Friday 13th his wife warned him to be careful on his ride to work (bad luck etc) so he used more cycle paths than normal and was exceptionally unlucky to be hit by a cyclist Geisterfahrer (someone riding on the wrong side of the road). There were cycle paths both sides of the road and she was on the wrong one and when she suddenly saw Jochen she swerved the wrong way and crashed into him!

He almost immediately popped the crashed bit out again and then gaffer taped it to hold it together.

It is now at Velomobiel.nl being repaired and Jochen is having all the fun of insurance surveyors for bikes that no surveyor really knows about! We hope Endeavour will have her nose remodelled soon so he can get back on the road.

Open day in Dronten

There was an Open Day at Intercitybike in Dronten where the DF Velomobile is built. Klaus and I went with Hartmut; our friend Ralf was also there with Jochen (to deliver Endeavour for her nose job). Ralf had the opportunity to inspect his new DF a week before he actually picked it up.

Hartmut also took the opportunity to try out some other Velomobiles as he’s still trying to decide what is best for his retirement. Intercitybike were opening their new Velomobile Museum which includes a Sinclair C5 (smaller and more plasticky than you would think), a Leitra, an Alleweder A4, a Versatile (Penelope’s green sibling) and a Quest, as well as other bits and pieces to look at. Interesting stuff. Especially interesting that my velomobile appears to be a museum piece!

Life in Germany

Now the new kitchen is complete Klaus and I have been doing much more cooking at home, including experimenting with new recipes. He is a very good cook and comes up with ideas for sauces and seasonings just from his head – and they have so far all been successful. I tend to follow recipes and my creations lean more towards the sweet/cake end of the spectrum.

Here is Klaus’s Zwiebelkuchen (a kind of quiche containing onions and with a bread rather than pastry crust):

I made a pineapple upside-down cake

I tried my hand at bread rolls with seeds – they were pretty good!

And also cookies – very crunchy!

However, we also had some hassles with the kitchen. After two weeks we discovered the floor was a bit wet and traced the leak to under the new sink. I asked Möbel Dahlmann to come and have a look the next day and they sent a chap who told me the problem was with the Eckventil (the bit that comes out of the wall with the pipes) and he wasn’t allowed to do anything with it. The problem was with our water installation, not what the kitchen fitters had done. This seemed remarkably unlikely to me, but he insisted I had to ask my landlord to have a look and went home again. Frank said on the phone he would sort it and in the meantime we wrapped towels round it and I was relieved to see that not too much water was coming out.

Frank had a good look on his day off two days later and discovered immediately that the problem was not with our bit of pipework but the divider pipework thingy that Dahlmann had fitted for the dishwasher/sink water supply. There were two washers in there rather than one – a real newbie mistake.

Unfortunately the water had left a stain as it hadn’t been visible under the special metal cupboard base and the base of the cupboard was swollen and bumpy.

Klaus and I went to Dahlmann in person to complain about this. Firstly that they hadn’t fitted it correctly and secondly that the chap who came out to look washed his hands of all responsibility within about five minutes and left me with a dripping water installation.

They offered to put a layer of fresh wood over the base of the unit and to give us a 200 Euro voucher for their shop. After consultation with Jochen (who works for a kitchen firm) we said that was not an acceptable option as there may well be problems with mould in the future as the cupboard carcass has had water ingress. No, we want an entirely new cupboard. This will clearly be quite a lot of work but I was very unhappy to think that after two weeks my kitchen was damaged through their bad fitting and I had pretty much worthless compensation (we weren’t planning on buying any more furniture).

Anyway, not sure when it is being fitted but at the moment everything has dried out OK and we are continuing to really enjoy the kitchen!

A short road trip holiday to Berlin and beyond

Klaus and I decided to take a couple of days off for a trip to Berlin as we both love it so much. We booked the time off work and then I realised that the following Tuesday and Wednesday were bank holidays (to celebrate 500 years since the Reformation) so we just needed to take Monday off to have a week’s holiday. so we did.

The place we had booked in Potsdam for Thursday to Sunday didn’t have availability for Monday onwards so we decided to do something different – and travel on to Usedom. We planned to stay one night there and then make our way slowly back west to Kempen, staying at Wismar and Mölln near Lübeck on the way back. We would also be collecting Poppy from Berlin on Sunday morning as she would be staying with Lars, having been delivered there by Gudula and Frank who had a short trip to Berlin just before us.

To Potsdam via Hannover

We set off after I finished work on Wednesday afternoon. I had lunch at home, sorted out a few things and then drove to Klaus’s office in Mülheim an der Ruhr where I transferred the items from my car boot to his. The items were my suitcase and various things for Lara who has recently moved to Berlin and had just moved into her own flat. Naturally it’s expensive kitting out a flat so we and her parents gathered up various bits and bobs such as plates, glasses, mugs, blankets, a small bin and – most importantly – a corkscrew, and we would deliver them to her on Saturday afternoon.

Her parents had visited the weekend before and brought large items of furniture, we were just supplementing with the small things she had forgotten.

Our plan was also not to drive all the way to Berlin (a minimum of 6 hours, often up to 10) but to go halfway, to Hannover, and stay there for the night. So we left Mülheim at 15:30 and headed east on the Autobahn, ending up stuck in a traffic jam for an hour and a half where the Autobahn was closed. That was fun.

We arrived in Hannover at 20:00 so were very relieved we had not planned to drive all the way to Berlin, we were staying in a hotel where Klaus’s company always stay during the Hannover Messe so he knew it well.

After a relaxing evening meal (with a pumpkin theme) it was nice to retire to our room and rest a bit before the journey to Berlin the next day.

After a very lavish breakfast we set off at 10:00 towards Berlin (well, Potsdam actually, we that was where our Guest House was). But we had decided to stop on the way at Tangermünde which we had visited on our Velomobile tour in June. We found the Kaffeerösterei there which was lovely and Klaus wanted to replenish his stock of coffee!

On the way we passed the town of Gifhorn which seemed to have an awful lot of windmills – we counted six when waiting at these traffic lights!

We also then passed an amazing building, the Glockenpalast, which would be worth a visit some other time!

We approached Tangermünde from the opposite direction than our bike tour and got to see more of the town – which was really lovely!

I saw this sign which  made me think of chum Hartmut!

A UK cycling chum had stayed in Tangermünde before and told me that there was a shop selling items from the former East. It was still there.

We had a good wander around and then it was time for the coffee shop!

Klaus had the nougat cake and I the Himbeer. We enjoyed our cakes very much and then Klaus bought another pack of coffee beans which should tide him over for another month or so. The company do deliveries too so he will order in the future.

After our cake we went to visit the Elbe river and have a look. We sat on a bench with our back to the river and you can see how high they built the town – necessary because of periodic river floods. There was a high water mark at well over 1 metre 50 in the gatehouse.

I was 14:30 when we set off and as we didn’t need to get to Potsdam in a major hurry we drove cross country rather than the Autobahn which was much nicer. Many of the roads were ones we had taken on our tour, including passing the large monastery at Jerichow and the Concentration Camp Memorial near Genthin.

We arrived at Guesthouse Villa Fritz in Potsdam and checked into our apartment which was on two levels with a spiral staircase down to the kitchen  and bathroom. After a short rest we walked down the road to Lidl to buy some breakfast (cereal, milk, yoghurt) for the next day as there was no breakfast included with our Guest House. We also ate a bit of apple cake which I had brought with me; it had been given to me by Jerzy, a chap from Poland who is working with us at the moment in my company to do Quality Assurance on products for my customer. Jerzy has been corrupted into our cake-eating ways so brought me something from a Polish  bakery. It was a very well-travelled cake as it went from Poland to Kempen to Potsdam…

That evening we walked to an Italian restaurant about 1.5 kilometres away which was very pleasant. On the way back we walked through the Dutch Quarter.

The next morning we decided to visit Schloss Sanssouci and the Neues Palais which are major landmarks in Potsdam.

We both needed haircuts and spotted a hairdresser that could fit us in so popped in there. I had this large doggie lying by my feet whilst my hair was being cut!

We walked on to Schloss Sanssouci. It was a bit of a grey day with spots of rain, and my photography is very poor here, but the castle was very impressive because of its terraced gardens.

We walked up the steps and discovered the castle is single storey!

After sitting down for a while watching the world go by, and marvelling that tourists still use Selfie Sticks, we walked on to the Neues Palais.

This was actually a pretty long way and our feet were hurting so we jumped on a bus back to Potsdam centre and stopped for a lunch of soup and cake.

This was my cake (not really a pie):

 

And Klaus went for his usual favourite, a Käse-Sahne Torte.

We walked along the pedestrian area and ended up looking in a few shops. Klaus bought a great winter coat and a hat, I got a couple of t-shirts so it was pretty successful.

Our feet were very tired by the time we got home so we rested for a bit with a cup of tea before heading out to an Indian restaurant for dinner. Indian restaurants seem rather thin on the ground near Kempen but there were several in Potsdam so we decided to give one a go.

It was a definite success!

All this plus puppodums and chutneys and drinks and Onion Bhaji came to less than 40 Euros so was excellent value.  I very much recommend Indian Garden in Potsdam!

we ended up walking 12.9km for the day so that was rather unusual for us. Cycling long distances yes, walking no…

A day in Berlin

The following day we had two planned events – meeting cycling acquaintances Clare and Duncan in Berlin near Alexanderplatz and seeing Lara’s new flat and taking her to dinner.

We left Potsdam about about 11 after a relaxing morning. It is interesting to drive through Berlin as the route took us along some of the roads we had cycled in June.

We parked at Alexanderplatz and went in search of a loo and some lunch. We then headed to Clare and Duncan’s hotel, passing a long line of Trabants and Wartburgs waiting in Karl-Marx-Allee.

We met Clare and Duncan and walked with them to the Nikolaiviertel, Klaus giving them a bit of info about Berlin and things we saw. At a cafe overlooking the Spree river we had some cake.

I saw this sign and was amused by the spelling of ‘mulled’, it gives rather a more negative connotation!

After a good chinwag we headed back to our car and set off to visit Lara in her new flat near Frankfurter Tor. We had various bits and bobs from home for her which she unpacked and Klaus had a look at her new washing machine to see if it could be plumbed in (no, she needed a longer set of hoses and would have to order them). After a cup of tea we set off to Potsdamer Platz for a dinner to celebrate Lara achieving her degree. We settled on an Australian restaurant which had kangaroo and crocodile on the menu but we chose more normal fare.

I was surprised by the beer mat though!

Here is Lara with her chum Gereon who was also visiting from Kempen with the lights of Potsdamer Platz behind.

Klaus ordered the steak pie and it was a real triumph!

We headed home in the car with Lara and Gereon making their way back east by train.

The next morning we would reunite ourselves with Poppy the dog!

From Berlin to Usedom – with an extra passenger

We duly checked out the next morning and drove to Charlottenburg (just half an hour away) where Lars lives. We were a bit early so he was still in bed when we arrived but his partner Lukas made us a cuppa and we had a good chat whilst Lars got dressed. Lars had been trying to persuade us to let him have Poppy for a bit longer but there wasn’t another convenient opportunity to collect her so we said no. She did seem pleased to see us, despite how much she loves Lars!

It was pouring with rain outside and super windy (storm Herwart) but we took Poppy for a short stroll for her to use the loo.

We had delivered a parcel of paintings for Lukas from Gudula and were given a box of cutlery and a fleece to take home to her. It was useful we were arriving by car just a week after their visit to pass on the forgotten items to Lars, Lara and back to Kempen.

The storm meant that the wind buffeted the car and we knew it was forecasted to be stronger on Usedom but felt it was safe enough to drive further.

it’s mostly a motorway route to Usedom but with intermittent mega rain we had some slower speeds.

There were occasional signs of blue sky up ahead and the forecast suggested it would be dry in Usedom and indeed the windscreen wipers were off as we crossed the bridge onto the island. We had cycled this route in the opposite direction so it was interesting to travel it by car.

Rather than going directly to the hotel we stopped at Wasserschloss Mellenthin for a short break. Klaus had suggested stopping there on our bike tour but I had said no as it was too early in the day at that time, but it was very convenient now as we hadn’t had lunch and the time was now 3:15.We had made a brief stop on the motorway but the food was so ridiculously expensive (5 Euros for a bag of crisps!) I had just bought a bread roll.

Wasserschloss Mellenthin had cakes!

The second cake there is a Sanddorntorte which contains a fruit/berry from Usedom. Translating Sanddorn we get ‘sallow’ or ‘sea buckthorn’ which doesn’t help me much, but he said it was ‘lecker’. My cake was a Schlossherrentorte but eating it didn’t make me a chatelaine.

After a nice relaxing break, and a chance for Poppy to stretch her little legs after being in the car boot for the journey, we set off for the final half hour drive to our hotel in Zinnowitz.

We checked in and relaxed for half an hour. Poppy was very tired!

We arranged to meet friends Rebecca and Henry in Ahlbeck at 19:30 so drove there and enjoyed an Italian meal before walking a few doors down to the wine bar where we met Rebecca and Henry last time.

We had a lovely evening chatting to them, although Henry’s very strong Usedom accent makes it a bit harder for me to understand him. Klaus enjoyed some wine and grappa and Poppy enjoyed a sleep on the table…

It was really windy of course but there were still some people walking about although very few cars on the road. I drove back, enjoying Usedom without traffic jams as it really does have an issue with tourists and cars in the daytime!

I was a bit cheesed off to see that Facebook had activated its Safety Check feature for the storm in Germany. Come on, storms are regular occurrences and Germany is big…

From Usedom to Wismar

The next morning the wind was still strong but the skies were wonderfully clear. We took Poppy for a morning walk along the seafront with a quick trip to the beach although the blowing sand was a bit much for Poppy so we only stayed there for a minute or so.

The roar of the waves was impressive!

And there were a few more branches lying on the floor.

We arranged to see Klaus’s friend Tim in his hotel in Zinnowitz at 11 o’clock so checked out and gave Poppy a bit of a walk before sitting with Tim in the lounge and having a great chat whilst Poppy listened.

It was lovely for me to meet Tim and for Klaus to catch up with his old chum again.

Before heading off to Wismar we decided to take a walk in the beautiful woodland next to Tim’s hotel and Poppy enjoyed it too.

We set off at about 14:00 but rather than driving straight to Wismar we did a short detour so I could see Peenemünde where the V2 rockets were developed I  WW2. It’s an impressive site with huge buildings.

There is also a Russian submarine at Peenemünde.

So this was a very interesting diversion for me!

We drove directly from Peenemünde to Wismar which was just over two hours’ driving with a small detour on the A20 motorway where some of the structure has collapsed. The road authorities have discovered the wrong size foundation stones were used so these kind of building bodge jobs can happen in Germany too!

We arrived at Wismar at 17:00 and checked into our room. I had a walk around with Poppy and discovered that Wismar is a lovely fishing town. It’s a Hanse Stadt and also is where the shop Karstadt came from. Tomorrow we will have a look around, plus visit a coffee shop that Klaus really likes.

We ate our evening meal in the restaurant and it was very good. Klaus had his first ever cup of Earl Grey tea and liked it! We have discovered that our food tastes are similar but our drink preferences very different!

With a final walk for Poppy it was time to sleep before our next day’s travel.

From Wismar to Schwerin to Mölln

After a hearty breakfast we packed up the car but left it in the hotel car park as we wanted to walk around Wismar. Which turns out to be a lovely town indeed.

Wismar is a Port where previously items such as peat were delivered. There seemed to be a fair amount of building work taking place. It was a public holiday in Germany so the shops were shut (except for restaurants etc) but still lots of people were out walking.

This was an interesting church. It was damaged in the war and the main body of the church could not be repaired (the foundations are there to see) so just the tower remains. Lots of the buildings in Wismar are in red brick.

The fronts of these buildings are very typical.

We stopped at a cafe overlooking the central square for some cake.

We had planned to go to the Kaffeerösterei that Klaus had previously visited but he didn’t open until 2pm. Despite the fact he was open when we arrived at 11:45 – but this was just for the cleaning lady apparently. So we had to find somewhere else – not too difficult in a city like Wismar which has loads of cafes.

Although it was cold we decided to sit outside which is a bit easier for Poppy. Klaus was happy to have his new hat and coat!

I had this chocolate cake and Klaus a sanddorn cake.

After our cake and tea we returned to the car and set off.

Klaus suggested we visited Schwerin which wasn’t far down the road, so we headed there. It turned out to have a rather impressive castle which is actually the local government building (Landtag) https://en.m.wikipedia.org/wiki/Schwerin_Palace. Rather amazingly we were able to park free about 100 meters from the castle!

It is on the list to become a UNESCO World Heritage site and you can see why!

It was a grey day when we visited with some drizzle but we could imagine how it would look with some golden autumn sunshine such as we had on Usedom.

I liked this golden cupola.

There was also a man-made cave area as we walked around the grounds. In winter it is a roost for bats, but I attempted a James Bond-style photo of Klaus. But failed.

The Poppy one was equality unsuccessful.

We walked the whole way around the castle on its island. It was lovely!

We then decided to walk into the Schwerin shopping area to get a spot of lunch. This was just 100 metres from the castle and we walked around doing a bit of window shopping until the rain was a bit heavier and we decided to find a cafe.

Klaus had a warm drink from Sanddorn and some Gulaschsuppe.

I had tea and a waffle.

We walked a little more after our food and then returned to the car for the final 60km to Mölln.

Mölln is sort-of in the middle of nowhere, south of Lübeck. On our drive today we were checking out the cycle paths and they are very good. We are making plans to drag chum Ralf on a week’s Velomobile holiday riding around this region as it is so lovely and there isn’t too much traffic.

We crossed the border from Mecklenburg-Vorpommern to Schleswig-Holstein and noticed the sign on the border reminding us that Germany had been divided for so long.

A short time later we arrived in Mölln but the navi suggested we had to drive another 2km to our hotel. Which turned out to be in the middle of a wood on the side of a lake, and our ‘room’ was actually a suite with lounge, two bedrooms, kitchen and balconies. Here is the view from one of the balconies as dusk was approaching.

It was incredibly peaceful and quiet.

We had a very tasty meal in the restaurant, Wildragout mit Rotkohl und Spätzle

Poppy sat quietly under the table during our meal. She has been such a good doggie on this trip!

The drive home – from Mölln to Kempen

All good things must come to an end and this included our holiday.

We had a very relaxed breakfast and after checking out and putting our luggage in the car we took Poppy for a walk along the side of the lake. It was lovely!

We returned to the hotel to jump into the car. This is it – for 95 Euro for the night it was amazing value. The lady said they are already fully booked for Fridays and Saturdays in 2018 for weddings, which I can understand.

With Poppy installed in the boot we set off, heading towards Hamburg and the motorway.

There were the usual traffic jams around Hamburg which lost us a lot of time, as did a suggested detour at Bremen which seemed to take longer than the traffic jam on the motorway would have done (according to Google Maps anyway). But such is life travelling on the busy German Autobahnen.

After four hours it was time to stop for Poppy to have a pee, and we also felt like some lunchtime cake.

These were actually not bad, 2,99€ each and my hot water for tea was free. Klaus chose another Earl Grey tea, and I commented that I have returned from this holiday with a hat-wearing Earl Grey-drinking chap. Where has the old Klaus gone? The new Klaus is nice too though!

After a half hour break we were back on the road, heading to Mülheim to Klaus’s workplace to pick up my car. All was well with my Roomster and we drove home in convoy, arriving back st 6pm to an empty house. Everyone else was out, which rather disappointed Poppy.

It was nice to be home but we have had a brilliant holiday. And the good news is that in two weekends’ time we will be having another trip, this time a weekend in Dresden. I am already looking forward to it.

And another note, Poppy the dog is a great holiday companion. She is amazingly low maintenance and gets lots of pats and cuddles from people we meet on the way.

Cakes this month

Here is the montage of cakes this month that haven’t appeared in the images above. I think I have had less than half of these, lots of them were eaten by Klaus or other chums. Honest!!

I hope you have enjoyed this month’s report. As always, comments are welcome.

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Filed under Cycling in Germany, Millie the Milan GT Carbon, Penelope the Velomobile, Recumbent Trikes

For Sale: Penelope the Versatile Velomobile

For Sale: Penelope, Versatile 006

Under 6000km completed before I bought her almost 4 years ago, I have ridden 15500km, so 22000km in total, or less.

As I am no longer riding her (due to Millie the Milan) and my new Quattrovelo will arrive early next year, it’s time to find a new home for Penelope.

Here is her specification:

Rohloff 14 speed
16.5 cm cranks
SPD/combi pedals
70mm drum brakes
Panzerlenkung
Versatile seat
Versatile roof
12V lighting system
3 batteries
Battery charger
2 x B&M 60 Lux lights to the front (upgrades) + one rear light
LED strip red/white lights on the sides.
Mats for the floor
Hooter/horn
Mount for Garmin (currently for Oregon but can be changed for other Garmins)
Front wheels have Schwalbe Shreddas, rear wheel has Schwalbe Marathon Greenguard.
British flag can be easily removed!!!

Last maintenance April 2015 at Ligfietsshop Tempelman: Rohloff, swing-arm, transmission cables, general check-over. Penelope has not really been used over the last year since I bought my Milan, she has been sitting in a garage, therefore I have decided to sell her.

Bodywork in very good condition for a Velomobile of this age, just scratches on the sides and a small crack on the side towards the nose (repaired from inside and covered with the vinyl wrap). As she is an early model the panel fit isn’t brilliant but she is pretty waterproof in normal usage with the Versatile Roof.

Approximate weight with normal luggage (toolkit, spare tyres etc) 45kg. She is pretty quiet in normal usage (although you do hear the noisy Rohloff gear ratios) and you never get anywhere near the chain, it is completely encapsulated, so you don’t end up oily at all. It is not possible to fit an electric motor to this Velomobile.

In February 2015 we added a vinyl wrap to cover the scratches on both sides (from rolling onto her side) and then also LED lights across the sides. http://www.auntiehelen.co.uk/penelope-gets-a-makeover/

There is lots of other information available about Penelope on my blog: http://www.auntiehelen.co.uk/penelope-the-velomobile/ with vast amounts of pictures, discussion on maintenance etc.

Location: Kempen in Niederrhein (2km from Junction 5 of the A40).

Cost: 3000 EUR.

If you are interested please send a message through this blog (on the right hand side under ‘Contact me directly’.

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Filed under Penelope the Velomobile, Recumbent Trikes